For Honor Features

FeatureThe year in loot boxes

The empire strikes back.

The great Star Wars debacle - and I'm not talking about The Last Jedi's second act here - dominated video game headlines in the last quarter of 2017. But in truth the year was packed with depressing stories about loot boxes, so many in fact that it has at times felt like our beloved hobby was more about the chance to win a rare item than it was about the chance to play.

FeatureSay it in less

On the joy of leaving your mic off in multiplayer.

"Two prisoners whose cells adjoin communicate with each other by knocking on the wall," goes an aphorism penned by the French mystic and political activist Simone Weil. "The wall is the thing which separates them but is also their means of communication. It is the same with us and god. Every separation is a link." I doubt Weil would have been very pleased to see this sentiment applied to a video game like Rainbow Six: Siege - in which the only god is line-of-sight, and tapping on walls is a great way to get yourself shot in the ear. But I like to think she'd have appreciated how creatively players of such games reach out to one another through the simulation's constraints, especially once you remove direct speech from the equation.

Right, me again this week. I've been having a bit of a think about Eurogamer's Weekly Podcast That We Do and how best to propel us to the next level. If I'm being entirely honest with you, I've got aspirations for an Audible sponsorship. All the big podcasts have one. How many listeners do you need for one of those? Actually, how many listeners do we even have?

I guess you could describe For Honor's single-player campaign as a training ground for the main event. A place to get to grips with each of the game's heroes and their distinct fighting styles, without the pressures of competition and voice chat. You could make that argument. But gosh, it's a boring place to be.