The Elder Scrolls Online Features

FeatureHow does the new Morrowind measure up to the classic version?

A super-fan ventures into The Elder Scrolls Online.

Is it possible to enjoy The Elder Scrolls Online's Morrowind expansion if you're a fan of the original game who hates MMOs? Is it folly to even try? Either way, I loved Morrowind too much to ignore the arrival of its multiplayer-focused quasi-prequel.

FeatureEscaping Skyrim's shadow

And laying the ground for Elder Scrolls 6.

When I look back on my 90 hours with The Elder Scrolls 5: Skyrim, I think of constellations rearing gossamer heads over the hills near Whiterun. I think of sunken cities grown copper-green with age, of flipping through books for mention of long-extinct civilisations, and snow licking the path to the summit of the Throat of the World. OK, so I also think of dragons that fly backwards and that time I had to Fus Roh Dah a bug-stricken Lydia across a mountain range, but these are stray notes, hiccups in an otherwise blissful aria.

FeatureThe Elder Scrolls Online still feels limited in its opening hours

First impressions from Tamriel Unlimited, the console version of Bethesda's MMO.

"You can see how making a massively multiplayer version of a popular single-player role-playing game would look like a no-brainer to a publishing executive." So began Oli's review of the PC version of The Elder Scrolls Online in April last year.

FeatureThe Elder Scrolls Online renounces the grind

But can you really have a traditional MMO without it?

Imagine a point almost exactly halfway between The Elder Scrolls 5: Skyrim and your traditional mainstream massively multiplayer RPG, for which the reference points are, in 2014, still the first EverQuest and World of Warcraft. This is where you will find The Elder Scrolls Online. I've spent around 20 hours in the beta. I have much still to discover, but my overwhelming impression is of equipoise - of a game balanced with conscientious, almost fearful care between the two things that it is trying to be.