Metro Redux

Key events

Face-Off: Metro Redux

Digital FoundryFace-Off: Metro Redux

Cross-format analysis, plus original vs remaster comparisons on PC.

Some might say that Deep Silver did everything it could to address the various controversies surrounding current-gen console remasters with the launch of its remarkable Metro Redux. 4A Games handed in code that was a truly transformative experience compared to its PS3 and Xbox 360 predecessors, it significantly improved and modernised Metro 2033 and the publisher did its best to bypass the 'rip-off cash-in' arguments often levelled at remasters by bundling both games together in a retail package available in the UK for less than 30. But what about PC?

This one was always going to be trickier. Resolution and frame-rate boosts mean little to a PC audience accustomed to tweaking settings and upgrading hardware in order to get the gameplay experience it wants. The idea of value is wildly skewed in the world of Steam summer sales - and where the original version of Metro 2033 was at one point literally given away for free. Deep Silver hasn't actively marketed any game-changing improvements to Metro Last Light, while the revised version of Metro 2033 has been accused of being 'nerfed' owing to 4A opting to rely less heavily on volumetric lighting in certain situations.

In many ways, this is a dual-purpose Face-Off, then. Not only are we stacking up all three versions of the dual-game Redux, but the PC version - which also bundles up all of the existing DLC - clearly demands comparison to the existing editions of the game. That takes us up to ten different Metro versions we've played over the last month then, with plenty of discussion points still to cover, so let's dive in with the apparently contentious Metro 2033.

Read more

Digital FoundryMetro Redux: what it's really like to develop for PS4 and Xbox One

Frank discussion with 4A Games about the new wave of consoles.

As tech interviews go, this one's a corker. Readers of our previous Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light tech Q&As will know that 4A Games' chief technical officer Oles Shishkovstov isn't backward about coming forward on the matters that are important to him, and in the transition across to the new wave of console hardware, clearly there are plenty of important topics to discuss.

Hello. Today's live stream strap doesn't have much to do with the grimy post-apocalyptic world of the Metro games, but a commenter came up with it for that story about the fish playing Street Fighter, and it was too good not to use.

Performance Analysis: Metro Redux

Digital FoundryPerformance Analysis: Metro Redux

Last Light and 2033 head-to-head on PS4 and Xbox One.

Last week we presented a first look at the forthcoming Metro Redux - remastered versions of the classic Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light coming soon to Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC. We compared the new editions to the original console versions, noting some remarkable differences - not least the impressive boosts to both physical and temporal resolution. Xbox One renders at 912p vs the PS4's 1080p, but it was the frame-rate lock to 60fps that really caught the eye.

The Xbox One version of Metro 2033 dropped just two frames throughout our test duration, while PlayStation 4 proved flawless across the length of our Metro Last Light tests. However, questions remained unanswered from last week's article - could PS4 match Xbox One's excellent performance on Metro 2033 while retaining its resolution advantage? And perhaps more importantly, could the Xbox One handle the more technologically ambitious Metro Last Light with the same aplomb as the PlayStation 4 version?

We went back to the Redux versions this week and captured several hours' worth of footage, producing new assets to match our existing work, and the results are all good. Our first port of call is Metro Last Light - the more modern of the two titles and thus the game more likely to challenge the Xbox One hardware. We see adaptive v-sync kick in twice during our test session, resulting in a minute amount of fleeting tearing at the very top of the screen - essentially invisible then, tucked into the overscan on most displays. To all intents and purposes, this is a locked 60 frames per second.

Read more

Metro Redux video compares original Metros to next-gen remasters

Deep Silver has released a cool new video that shows how the graphics of Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light have improved for the upcoming Metro Redux remaster collection.

Metro Redux, created by 4A Games, is due out for PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on 29th August, and includes updated versions of post-apocalyptic horror shooters Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light.

It runs at a "rock solid" 60 frames per second on both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, but we're not too sure about the resolution. Digital Foundry will tomorrow publish an analysis that should provide more clarity. Of course, on PC the resolution is whatever your rig can handle. And on PC Metro Redux supports 4K resolution.

Read more

Digital FoundryDigital Foundry vs Metro Redux

Xbox 360 vs Xbox One. PS3 vs PlayStation 4. Is this the remaster you've been waiting for?

The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One remasters are coming thick and fast, bringing with them a wave of controversy - should developers be concentrating resources on porting over games they've already made? Are resolution and frame-rate boosts enough? Most crucially of all, do they represent value for money? The Metro Redux package from Kiev-based 4A Games puts forward a hell of a good case: you get two complete games for 30 and each title is available solus via digital delivery for those who already own one of the originals. But most importantly of all, the remastering work is very, very good. In fact, we'd say it's up there with the best.

Metro Redux release date announced

Metro Redux release date announced

Going deeper underground.

Metro Redux launches on 29th August 2014 in Europe and 26th August in the US fro PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, Deep Silver has announced.

Metro Redux includes remastered versions of 4A Games shooters Metro 2033 and Metro: Last Light alongside all previously released add-on content.

The legendary Ranger Mode is included in both games.

Read more

See what Metro's next-gen remakes look like in action

Due this summer, "Redux" runs in 60 fps, adds new gameplay modes.

Metro 2033 and its sequel, Metro: Last Light, are getting next-gen remakes this summer with "Redux" versions coming to PS4, Xbox One and PC. Now, publisher Deep Silver has revealed the first gameplay footage of both titles in Metro Redux.