Crysis Features

It's been ten years since Crysis first released on PC. In 2007, it pushed real time rendering to new heights and spawned the memetic phrase, "but can it run Crysis?". Never had a game released that pushed hardware and engine technology so much, and never has one since. In fact, combine the latest and greatest Intel Core i7 8700K overclocked to 5.0GHz with an Nvidia Titan Xp and there'll still be areas of the game that drop beneath 60fps - even at 1080p. For its own very specific reasons, Crysis is still more than capable of melting the most modern, top-end PCs, but regardless, it remains a phenomenal technological achievement. It deserves a remaster at the very least, but a franchise of this standing really deserves a full next-gen sequel, with state-of-the-art rendering and back-to-basics gameplay.

All hail Crysis, the "Maximum Game". How odd it feels to revisit this legendary mass-melter of motherboards, this bane of frame rates and comparison threads, on what passes for a budget gaming laptop 10 years down the line. The intro especially rouses much the same sense of everlasting absurdity and pathos you might get from Hadrian's Wall or a Microsoft Zune, an orgiastic showreel in which bullets flatten themselves against quivering artificial muscles, and North Korean troopers gape at all the high-octane graphicsability coruscating around them as they're hurled headlong into their friends. Once upon a time, you think to yourself, we called this the future. Alas, futures seldom age that gracefully.

Ditching Far Cry, piracy, gameplay and just about breaking even: Crytek on the ups and downs of the Crysis series

FeatureDitching Far Cry, piracy, gameplay and just about breaking even: Crytek on the ups and downs of the Crysis series

As Crysis turns 5 Cevat Yerli contemplates past mistakes and a bold new future.

Tomorrow marks the five year anniversary of the Crysis franchise.

The science fiction shooter series began on 13th November 2007 with the release of Crysis for PC, a launch that carried much fanfare. Here was a shooter that was part open world sandbox, a fitting follow-up to the company's first game Far Cry, part graphics showcase. The hype for months before launch was that Crysis was the best-looking game ever created. Not only was your PC not good enough to run it - no-one's was.

Three and a half years later Crytek released Crysis 2. But there was a catch: the game was no longer a PC exclusive. Crytek had, according to some, sold out. And as more information about the new New York setting emerged and this new “choreographed sandbox” was laid bare, fans of the first game accused the developer of dumbing down the core Crysis gameplay to accommodate the console audience.

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Digital FoundryCan Consoles Run Crysis?

Digital Foundry lays out the ultimate test for CryEngine 3.

It's just over two years since CryTek released its astonishing first-person shooter Crysis, and despite enormous technological leaps in the PC space, it remains the single most important game available for testing graphical performance. At maximum settings, even the most powerful available combination of CPU and GPU still cannot run this game at 1080p with a sustained, v-synced, 60 frames per second.

FeaturePC: 12 Games of Christmas

Oh look, mistletoe!

Stop clowning around; it really is bastardly cold out there. Still, it's good for one thing: keeping my PC from overheating. All I have to do is wrap up warm and open my window, then pop in one of these festively fantastic frolics and laugh away merrily - probably with a vat of mulled wine close-by to ensure I am well and truly smashed. I'm only giving it serious consideration because there are some games worth seriously considering.

FeatureCrytek's Cevat Yerli

On Crysis and being super badass.

Last week, we published an exclusive preview of Crytek's forthcoming PC shooter, Crysis. And some screenshots. And some videos, come to think of it.

FeatureCrysis

World exclusive Crytek studio tour - complete with multiplayer.

To get Eurogamer.de's unique take on Crysis (in German) from our exclusive studio visit to Crytek in Frankfurt, look no further. For Eurogamer.fr's coverage (in French), look right here.

FeatureCrysis

More on the suit, dirty windscreens and crazy little silencers.

Crysis lead designer Jack Mamais is grinning. Microsoft's game showing at CES is relatively small compared to the insanity that was E3, but the reaction his baby's getting leaves nothing to the imagination. Even in its pre-alpha state, PC shooter Crysis looks absolutely knock-out, especially to the general consumer crowd.

FeatureCrysis

E3: Junglist massive.

So. To start off with, we could tell you the one about how Crysis is being developed by Crytek, and how it also developed Far Cry, and about the Ubisoft / EA switch, but you probably know all that already. Or we could start with the storyline, which is basically about fighting aliens in jungles and isn't likely to excite anyone who's played more than two videogames very much. So instead, let's start with what you really need to know about Crysis: it looks superb.