Crysis Warhead

Spotlight

Ditching Far Cry, piracy, gameplay and just about breaking even: Crytek on the ups and downs of the Crysis series

As Crysis turns 5 Cevat Yerli contemplates past mistakes and a bold new future.

Digital FoundryCrysis Warhead 1080p, DX9 Max Settings: GTX 670 vs. GTX 680 Video

Crytek's visual masterpiece still gives modern graphics cards horrific nightmares.

Digital FoundryCrysis Warhead 1080p, DX9 Max Settings: GTX 580 vs. GTX 680 Video

The Digital Foundry grail quest continues - even on the latest hardware we can still cannot run the original Crysis games at 1080p60 on max settings.

Crysis Warhead

Ice to see you.

Ditching Far Cry, piracy, gameplay and just about breaking even: Crytek on the ups and downs of the Crysis series

Ditching Far Cry, piracy, gameplay and just about breaking even: Crytek on the ups and downs of the Crysis series

As Crysis turns 5 Cevat Yerli contemplates past mistakes and a bold new future.

Tomorrow marks the five year anniversary of the Crysis franchise.

The science fiction shooter series began on 13th November 2007 with the release of Crysis for PC, a launch that carried much fanfare. Here was a shooter that was part open world sandbox, a fitting follow-up to the company's first game Far Cry, part graphics showcase. The hype for months before launch was that Crysis was the best-looking game ever created. Not only was your PC not good enough to run it - no-one's was.

Three and a half years later Crytek released Crysis 2. But there was a catch: the game was no longer a PC exclusive. Crytek had, according to some, sold out. And as more information about the new New York setting emerged and this new “choreographed sandbox” was laid bare, fans of the first game accused the developer of dumbing down the core Crysis gameplay to accommodate the console audience.

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Digital FoundryCan Consoles Run Crysis?

Digital Foundry lays out the ultimate test for CryEngine 3.

It's just over two years since CryTek released its astonishing first-person shooter Crysis, and despite enormous technological leaps in the PC space, it remains the single most important game available for testing graphical performance. At maximum settings, even the most powerful available combination of CPU and GPU still cannot run this game at 1080p with a sustained, v-synced, 60 frames per second.

UK charts: Force Unleashed the new star

WAR also strong. Top 40 inside.

Star Wars: The Force Unleashed has crushed opposition and taken top honours in the UK all-formats chart this week, in what was the biggest multi-platform launch since GTA IV.

Crysis Warhead

Crysis Warhead

Ice to see you.

Let's start with the bad news, because there isn't really very much of it. Crysis Warhead is not a particularly long game - in fact, if you're playing on normal settings, and you're familiar with the first entry in the series, you can probably clock this at somewhere between five and seven hours.

But is that really bad news? Because although Warhead isn't the most time-consuming initial playthrough - it's a side-story rather than a true sequel, after all - it manages to throw in a surprising amount of variety, and, with that, a considerable degree of replayability. It may not take days of your life to complete, but it never asks you to do the same thing twice, and the chances are that, as with the original, each subsequent playthrough will reveal an unexpected side to most of the set-pieces.

The basic mechanics remain unchanged. Taking place within the original Crysis' timeline, your suit powers are still the same - cloak, strength, speed, and the standard armour setting - and it's still you against the North Korean Army, battling through the same beautifully rendered jungle and waiting for those floaty Matrix-style aliens to show up and turn everything into ice.

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Crysis Warhead

Isle be back.

Remember Crysis? Crytek's lavish hymn to frozen jungles, nano-machine upgrades and casual illiteracy was the game that gave you a whole archipelago to mess around in, rendered down to the last grain of sand. It was the game that was meant to push graphics technology so far into the future that most PCs would burst into flames the moment you put the disk in the drive. And it's also the game that, less than a year after its release, is already getting a follow-up.