Codemasters has picked up Evolution Studios - and in the process turned the once PlayStation-exclusive developer multiplatform.

Last month Sony announced the closure of Cheshire-based Evolution Studios, leaving the future of Driveclub - and the jobs of its developers - in doubt.

Now, Codemasters, maker of the Dirt and Grid series of games, has rescued Evo, maker of Driveclub and MotorStorm. Codemasters said the acquisition makes it the world's largest racing-focused games company.

Meanwhile, Sony's Mick Hocking has joined Codemasters as vice president of product development. Hocking spearheaded Sony's ill-fated 3D gaming push and managed Evo while at Sony Computer Entertainment Europe.

"We've got the opportunity to write new tech on multiple platforms for the first time, to work on new ideas," Hocking told GamesIndustry.biz. "It's really exciting. It's really the core team we've brought across."

Paul Rustchynsky, who worked at Evo for almost 12 years and led development of Driveclub, is sticking with the studio as it changes owners.

Sony, as you'd expect, retains the rights to both Driveclub and MotorStorm, but fans of those games will be excited by the prospect of its developers getting the chance to make a new racing game.

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Wesley Yin-Poole

Wesley Yin-Poole

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