When Sony originally showed The Last Guardian running on PS3, the video wasn't apparently representative of how the game actually performed - but was "specced up" for the occasion.

In reality, "the game was running at a much lower frame rate", Sony Worldwide Studios boss Shuhei Yoshida told Kotaku at E3.

As development drew excruciatingly on, and the PS3 struggled to cope with the game's vision, PS4 dev kits arrived - and a solution presented itself. The Last Guardian became a PS4 game in 2012.

"In 2011 the progress became super slow," Yoshida said. "There were lots of technical issues. The game was not performing at speed. The video we showed, the trailer on PS3, was specced up. The game was running at a much lower frame rate. Some features were still missing. It was clear that the team had to make a compromise in terms of features.

"But in the meantime PS4 arrived, the development environment was available. So in 2012 it became apparent we should move it to PS4 to achieve the visual [ideal]."

I spoke to Yoshida at E3 in 2012 and he told me the game was still having "technical difficulties", but he dismissed the notion it had become a PS4 game. "What does that question mean?" he countered. "It is a PS3 game."

Yoshida also downplayed rumours, to Kotaku, that PS4 lead architect and Knack creator Mark Cerny had been drafted in to rescue The Last Guardian. Remember, The Last Guardian creator Fumito Ueda walked away from Sony in 2011, although he's attached to the project again today, albeit working out of his own studio GenDesign.

"Mark has been consulting many of the first-party teams and projects, giving advice on the tech side," Yoshida said. "Not just him, but other central tech groups we have from the US and UK have been helping the team as well."

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.