Valve has stepped up its anti-cheat measures and issued almost 95,000 bans in the last week alone.

In July 2017, we reported that on 6th July Valve banned over 40K Steam accounts for cheating, making it the single largest banhammer the company had ever deployed.

Emphasis on "had", though.

According to SteamDB, on Wednesday 18th July, 2018, Valve handed out a stunning 61,439 Valve Anti-Cheating (VAC) bans and 27,403 game bans, making it the platform's most hefty ban spree yet... and given Steam DB can't check every single Steam profile every day, that is supposedly a conservative estimate.

Screen_Shot_2018_07_22_at_14.55.33
Source: https://steamdb.info/stats/bans/

Totted up, that means - at the time of writing - 92,409 accounts have been banned in just the last seven days, taking down thousands of dollars worth of CS:GO skins, too (thanks, PCGamesN).

Why now? Valve hasn't elaborated, but it's likely VAC has uncovered a new cheat method - or methods - across one or more of the games it monitors, such as Ark: Survival Evolved, Left 4 Dead and L4D2, the Call of Duty games, the Counter-Strike games, Dota 2 and Team Fortress 2.

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Vikki Blake

Vikki Blake

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When​ ​her friends​ ​were falling in love with soap stars, Vikki was falling in love with​ ​video games. She's a survival horror survivalist​ ​with a penchant for​ ​Yorkshire Tea, men dressed up as doctors and sweary words. She struggles to juggle a fair-to-middling Destiny/Halo addiction​ ​and her kill/death ratio is terrible.

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