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Martin Robinson

Features and Reviews Editor

Martin is Eurogamer's features and reviews editor. He has a Gradius 2 arcade board and likes to play racing games with special boots and gloves on.

Featured articles

Monster Hunter World's first big expansion is unveiled

Iceborne coming next autumn - after Geralt comes to the base game.

Monster Hunter World's first big expansion has been announced, and it's the equivalent to the older 'G' or 'Ultimate' editions. Named as Iceborn, it'll arrive as an add-on to the base game next autumn.

Where, exactly, to start with a game like Super Smash Bros. Ultimate? Maybe it's in one of the 74-strong roster of fighters, such as newcomer Isabelle, who has the same propensity for getting shit done here as she does in her native Animal Crossing series. She's savage, a flurry of toy hammers and candy umbrellas plus a fishing rod used to reel in her opponents, and for her final trick she calls in the muscle, summoning Nook and co who immediately construct their town hall over your poor foe.

Ubisoft has fully lifted the covers off the post-apocalyptic Far Cry that it teased recently, with Far Cry New Dawn coming to Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC on 15th February.

FeatureResident Evil 2's remake reveals its biggest star

New enemies, new details and more from an extended hands-on.

Resident Evil's best character? Maybe you believe it's Leon Kennedy, the floppy-haired fop, or perhaps you think it could be enigmatic badass Ada Wong. Well, I'm afraid you're entirely wrong. The best character from throughout Resident Evil's history is, without a single doubt, the Raccoon City Police Station.

Milestone's a funny little developer, hovering indefinitely somewhere above or just below adequacy as it churns out game after game. Ride 3 is its fifth title this year (fifth!) and the latest instalment in a series that started as recently as 2015. Back then it was a noble if limited attempt to give bike enthusiasts their own Gran Turismo; a spirited run through some of the most storied machinery on two wheels that made a few too many compromises along the way. I liked it a fair amount back then, though clearly there was still some work to be done for Milestone to make good on the premise.

Excuse me for being a bit slow, but after spending a day with Red Dead Online, something that should have been obvious dawned on me. Maybe Rockstar's a developer whose focus is now more firmly placed on big, grand multiplayer experiences than it is the single-player experiences that made its name, and that first made me an admirer of its craft. And that perhaps should have been obvious if I'd have paid attention to the phenomenon that was Grand Theft Auto Online rather than moseying through GTA 5's campaign a couple of times before setting it to one side. Now I've sampled a little of what happens when Rockstar's open worlds go online, I'm kind of smitten.

When they're chalking up the greatest games of this generation, my belief - though maybe it's more of a hope - is that Alien: Isolation will find its place amongst the more predictable choices. An extended slice of slow-burn horror, and a smart piece of sci-fi, it's one of the rare occasions when a licensed game matched up to the source material. For my money, it's the single best Alien experience since the series' 80s prime.

I'm not sure when exactly it was decided that putting a screen on its side was a smart way to go about playing games, but I know that for some games it's the only way to play. It's why, over the years, I've risked various monitors by placing them on their side, so I could play the likes of Gunbird 2 or Ikaruga the right way. It's how I killed the hulking 32-inch CRT TV in my old shared flat in Deptford, its innards expiring with an almighty pop as I tried to demonstrate to a friend the magic of this thing they called tate mode.

It's one of those cute ironies that Rockstar Games, most famous for the virtual cityscapes of the Grand Theft Auto series, would create what many consider its masterpiece when working with the dust and dirt of the wilds. When it launched in 2010, the open-world western Red Dead Redemption was as refreshing as a chill blast of mountain air: a bucolic, melancholy counterpoint to the madcap urban caricature of GTA. And so it's fitting that the sequel, Red Dead Redemption 2, makes its greatest strides in its world.

Battlefield 5 is a mess. It's the glitchiest, most technically troubled DICE's sandbox multiplayer has been since the infamous launch of Battlefield 4, and even the launch itself is all over the place. Here's a game that's not out for paying punters until later this month. Or it's out today, if you're willing to pay a little bit more. Or, if you'd rather not pay for the whole thing, it's been out for a week for EA Access subscribers. Or maybe a bit over a week, if you're an EA Access Premier subscriber. Of course.

What an exquisitely busy weekend of racing it's just been. The impossible spectacle of Macau's street races, the intermittent spells of racing that broke out in-between the showers in China for the last 2018 round of the WEC Super Season and the 24 Hours of Cota. My own Sunday started with a 3am wake-up call for the 6 Hours of Shanghai, and ended up watching an ex-BTCC Toyota Avensis slowly lunch itself over the course of Brands Hatch's two hour Race Into The Night.

SNK, the Osaka-based company that's been enjoying something of a revival in the past two years, has over time become synonymous with the Neo Geo hardware and software that was such a muscular presence throughout the 90s. Understandably so, too; so many of these games remain a high watermark for 2D action and pixel art, and they've gained a cult following ever since. Metal Slug, The King of Fighters series and The Last Blade have enjoyed re-release upon re-release (I doubt there's a modern console that isn't host to a version of Metal Slug 3, and rightly so too - it's an essential text), while I myself have an MVS unit sitting proudly in the candy cabinet I call my own.

XO18 Inside Xbox special live report

Acquisitions! Expansions! Some weird bit about Winnie the Pooh! All the news as it happened.

Acquisitions! Expansions! Some weird bit about Winnie the Pooh! All the news as it happened.

Video games have a funny way of identifying different scales of productions. You've got triple-A and double-A, and now there's even some unsightly speak of 'triple-I', indie games with lavish production values of their own. Sometimes, you've just got to keep it simple though, as is the case with Steel Rats. This is an unabashed B movie of a game, a William Castle schlockathon of disparate parts that developer Tate Multimedia can't always get to hang together. But good lord is it fun to see them try.

FeatureWe've played the PlayStation Classic, and it's underwhelming

Mediocre emulation and an anaemic list of games - though there's still some magic there.

I first heard of it through a playground rumour; whisperings there was a machine that could run Ridge Racer, the game that had been wowing us all over the summer holidays at whatever low-rent seaside resort our families had dragged us to. And what's more, someone knew a friend of a friend who had one - who'd imported one from Japan and had Namco's polygon-rich racer playable in their own living room.

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