Assassin's Creed co-creator Patrice Désilets has gained control of 1666 Amsterdam, the open world historical adventure IP he was developing at Ubisoft before he was fired.

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No longer désolé.

The deal follows a protracted legal battle over the IP's ownership - and no love lost between Désilets and his former employer.

Today, it seems both sides have shaken hands and made up. Désilets now has "creative and business control" of the project, and has also withdrawn his "legal action against Ubisoft from the Superior Court of Québec", a joint statement proclaimed.

But, for the moment, 1666 Amsterdam remains in limbo. Désilets is deep into development of his new project Ancestors: the Humankind Odyssey at his startup studio Panache Digital Games, which will remain his immediate focus.

Here are the full statements from both sides:

"Putting aside our past differences, Patrice and I are above all interested in the creation of video games and the evolution of this medium of entertainment," said Yannis Mallat, Chief Executive Officer of Ubisoft Montréal and Toronto. "This agreement is good news for everyone.

"Ubisoft's creative teams are currently working on innovative projects that will mark our industry for years to come. This is precisely where we want to focus our energy, on our teams, to continue what we have been building in Quebec for nearly 20 years. As we have always said, Patrice is a talented designer and we wish him all the best in the development of his future endeavours."

Désilets added:

"I'm glad Ubisoft and I were able to come to an agreement that will allow me to obtain the rights to project 1666 Amsterdam. I will now devote myself entirely to the development of Ancestors: the Humankind Odyssey, my next game with Panache Digital Games.

"This is what matters most to me today: making the best games and showing the world the creative talent of Quebecers. I also wish every success to the Ubisoft teams."

1666 Amsterdam was in development at THQ Montreal and then Ubisoft - although never formally revealed - under Désilets' leadership when the director was unceremoniously terminated back in May 2013.

The ownership of 1666 Amsterdam has been under legal contention ever since.

After so much effort to regain the IP, Désilets may well return to the project at a later date. Alternatively, or for now at least, regaining the rights to the IP from his former employer may be enough.

Désilets' original idea for the game was for it to be "the new Assassin's Creed". Whether that is still possible - or even palatable - now, especially with Désilets' small team, is a whole other matter.

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Tom Phillips

Tom Phillips

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