Used game sales can be limited by making better games, Nintendo's Reggie Fils-Aime says

Most traded in are "annualised" and "undifferentiated" games.

Developers can limit used game sales by simply making their games better, Nintendo of America boss Reggie Fils-Aime has suggested.

Fils-Aime pointed to the relatively low trade-in and resale market for Nintendo products as proof.

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Nintendo makes games that you'll want to Koopa hold of.

"We have been able to step back and say that we are not taking any technological means to impact trade-in and we are confident that if we build great content, then the consumer will not want to trade in our games," Fils-Aime told Polygon.

"Certainly, that impact games that are annualised and candidly also impacts games that are maybe undifferentiated much more than [it] impacts Nintendo content."

Fils-Aime suggested that the replayability of Nintendo titles remained strong, a position supported by the the fact that even second-hand Nintendo titles keep a high price years after their initial release.

"The consumer wants to keep playing Mario Kart. The consumer want to keep playing New Super Mario Bros. They want to keep playing Pikmin," Fils-Aime continued. "So we see that the trade-in frequency on Nintendo content is much less than the industry average - much, much less.

It's a much more natural way to discourage second-hand sales, he concluded, and reiterated that Nintendo has no plans to restrict the used game market.

"We have been very clear, we understand that used games are a way for some consumers to monetize their games," Fils-Aime added, re-iterating the position of Nintendo's top designer Shigeru Miyamoto, who told Eurogamer yesterday that the company did not want to introduce restrictions on game ownership.

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