Lost: The Video Game

Key events

29th February 2008

Lost: The Video Game

7th January 2008

Lost Videogame details

X360 vs. PS3 Face-Off: Round 10

Digital FoundryX360 vs. PS3 Face-Off: Round 10

Vegas 2, Army of Two, Lost, Blacksite, Conflict, Lost Planet, DW6.

Welcome to the latest in Eurogamer's on-going coverage of cross-format games development, our chance to go back and supplement existing reviews with additional console-specific coverage.

As is the norm, there's roundup commentary on the gameplay of each title, combined with technical analysis for both PS3 and Xbox 360 releases. Backing that up is the usual range of 720p and 1080p (where PS3 supports it) full precision, full-range 24-bit RGB dumps of every game, courtesy of the Digital Foundry HD capture unit. With Eurogamer you get the full, uncompressed picture of what the respective consoles are pumping out, with no recourse to murky, jerky streaming video.

Onto the games then. There's quite an intriguing line-up of the best and the very, very worst in cross-platform development in this round, with an unintended emphasis on co-op gameplay and Epic's Unreal Engine 3 technology.

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Lost: The Video Game

Lost: The Video Game

It only took the bears two hours.

As I type, episode five of Lost's fourth season is showing in the USA. I'd like to know what happens in it. I'd like to know that a lot. If you couldn't care less, you might as well give up now; Ubisoft's Lost videogame, built around a story conceived by the TV show's executive producers, is not meant for you. There's probably enough here to grasp the basics of what's happening on this bizarre little island in the Pacific Ocean, but too much of it will be baffling or, worse, seem poorly justified. When John Locke tells you that the island has a will of its own, you'll look around at the invisibly walled jungle and beach and wonder if that's what he's on about.

It isn't, as disciples of the long-running series understand. Lost: The Video Game - or Lost: Via Domus, as it's known in the States - is designed to complement events in the first two seasons, so turn away now if you haven't got that far. It tells the story of a young man - another survivor of Oceanic Flight 815 - and his quest to recover his memory and understand the visions that he keeps experiencing of a young woman. Split into seven mini-episodes - complete with "Previously on Lost" bits at the start of each - it echoes the show's trick of inching through back-story via flashbacks as it floats through the present on a river of cliffhangers and people answering questions with riddles, sanctimony and bubblegum profundity.

When you wake up, it's to a wonderfully dense and detailed jungle rich with everything from banyan trees with their hollow-root hiding places to every manner of creeper, vine and long grass imaginable. As you pick through plane and human wreckage you come face to face with Kate, someone with whom you'll swap a lot of deep gazes and dialogue. Conversations unfold in the style of an old-days adventure game, with a selection of potential lines split across "Quest" and "General" categories. It's during this conversation that you experience your first flashback - to Kate's arrival on the plane, in handcuffs. Flashbacks show you torn-up Polaroid pictures and give you a camera with which to capture a moment to jog your memory, after which you can explore a small area to gather up to three further fragments of information. Then it's back to the present, where you can apply that information - you know Kate is a fugitive, and in putting this to her you're able to extract information, a process that sets the tone for puzzles that follow. It's all done with the show's trademark ears-draining-of-water whooshes and whomps. You'll feel right at home.

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Eurogamer TV: Exclusive Lost vids

Eurogamer TV: Exclusive Lost vids

Still none the wiser.

With a week to go before release, Ubisoft has had a rummage around in the hatch and dug out a couple of exclusive behind-the-scenese documentaries on the game of the cruellest TV show in history. And we remember Beadle's About.

"Authenticity" reveals how the dev team cosied up with the terribly important people who make the telly version, to make the game as authentic and captivating as possible for people who have messy dreams about miss-placed polar bears and smoke monsters.

Meanwhile, in "Beyond The Show" we learn how they went, er, beyond the show and created a new character, Elliot, who was among the crash survivors on the doomed flight 815 from Syndey. Elliot has his own backstory to explore, via playable flashbacks, which interlocks with the lives of the other main characters. You'll get to ferrett around previously unseen areas of places like The Hatch, Black Rock and Swan Station, seeking information on who the hell you are (you've got amnesia, naturally), and hopefully trying to slip one to Kate before Sawyer soils her.

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Lost

Jack, John and friends looking good.

Jack, John and friends looking good.

Lost

Don't tell it what it can and can't do.

Lost, as you undoubtedly know if you've peered out from underneath that rock in the last couple of years, starts with a bloody big plane crash - and if we're being totally honest, it's probably fair to say that you're here in the hopes of rubbernecking at yet another hideous crash.

Lost Videogame details

Lost Videogame details

Sort of. Gah.

Details of the Lost Videogame have popped up after people who could be bothered to sit through all the tedium of the Season 3 box set unearthed a preview video on one of the extras DVDs.

Therein we discover (or IGN discovers, we should say, in case it's all wrong) that you play as a chap of unknown name and origin who has survived Oceanic Flight 815 along with Jack, Sawyer and all the red-shirts and has lost his memory.

In a nod to the show's typical format, you will apparently experience flashbacks to who you were as you work your way across the island, as well as meeting members of the cast, witnessing familiar events and ultimately experiencing an ending conceived by one of the show's co-creators. Is that a good thing?

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Ubisoft details Lost game

Ubisoft details Lost game

Due out in Q1 2008.

Ubisoft has finally opened up about the Lost videogame it announced it had signed up to develop all the way back in May 2006. It will be out on Xbox 360, PS3 and PC in Q1 2008.

In a storyline that extends on the themes of the TV series, you'll get to play as a passenger on Oceanic flight 815 after it crash-lands on an island in the Pacific and things start "going spooky".

As with the main characters in the show - some of whom you'll interact with - you'll have to confront your dark past, seek redemption and ultimately find a way home.

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Lost game this year

Still can't find it.

Two of the executive producers on never-ending TV series Lost, Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse, have said the game based on the show will be out this year.

Lost videogames on the way

For PC, consoles, handhelds.

Lucky old Ubisoft has acquired the rights to produce a bundle of games based on Lost, the hit TV series that's still quite good even though it went a bit boring for a while there but seems like things are picking up now.