MadWorld release upsets moralists

NIMF registers disappointment.

Self-appointed American media watchdog and purveyor of moral outrage, the National Institute on Media and the Family (NIMF), has issued a thoroughly wholesome statement indicating its unhappiness with Nintendo after SEGA's stylish Wii brawler MadWorld saw release in the US yesterday.

The group claims that Nintendo has "shed its 'family friendly' reputation with MadWorld's release", indicating its belief that it is the platform-holder who should vet all content inappropriate for consumption by children, rather than those children's parents. However, it does concede that "MadWorld is another reminder that parents need to make sure they watch what their kids watch and play what their kids play".

NIMF goes on to decry what it sees as shift in Nintendo's marketing policy, claiming that "Nintendo [has] opened its doors to the violent videogame genre", and adding: "The National Institute on Media and the Family hopes that Nintendo does not lose sight of its initial audience and continues to offer quality, family-friendly games".

Don't worry too much about the claims being taken seriously, however; these are the same people who considered Stubbs the Zombie to be actively promoting cannibalism.

If you fancy having your impressionable psyche corrupted into going on a bloody chainsaw spree, head over to our MadWorld review first.

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About the author

Dan Pearson

Dan Pearson

European Editor

A ten year veteran, Dan joined Eurogamer as a lowly admin in 2006, working his way up to senior reporter before moving over to GamesIndustry.biz in 2010. He covers all areas of the business, but has a particular passion for indies and new technologies. He spends much of the rest of his time killing dwarves in poorly constructed fortresses. His dog is brilliant.

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