Rather than competing with the music industry, videogames are giving musicians opportunities that they didn't have before, says Tom Holkenborg.

The musician, better known as Junkie XL, thinks that the music and videogame industries go hand in hand, with many kids playing games and listening to music.

"I think that one of the cool things that videogames also offer is that, once the sound palate has been set for a certain game, music supervisors really go 'digging in the crates' to find cool stuff that matches that profile," he told our sister site GamesIndustry.biz.

When developers choose music for a game's soundtrack from a band that most people may not have heard of, it provides great exposure for those young bands.

"That's what sets videogames apart from radio," Holkenborg said.

"Usually what you hear on the radio is massive...it is supposed to be a big hit. What you hear in videogames is not necessarily meant for that. It is meant for a different approach.

"The general music approach for videogames is a more honest and a more real one..."

The complete interview with Junkie XL, whose music is featured in Need for Speed: ProStreet, can be found on GamesIndustry.biz.

GamesIndustry.biz has a lovely singing voice.

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GamesIndustry International

GamesIndustry International is the world's leading games industry website, incorporating GamesIndustry.biz and IndustryGamers.com.

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