A cluster of new Remedy job adverts has dropped interesting hints at what may be Alan Wake 2.

Four of the five positions mentioned a "AAA console project". And one specifically referenced Alan Wake.

"You will be working on the next iteration of Remedy's unique world-class rendering engine that was previously used in Alan Wake," outlined the vacancy for a 3D graphics programmer.

Microsoft hasn't announced a second Alan Wake game. In June Microsoft Game Studios' Phil Spencer said he didn't think Remedy had signed the possible project with a publisher, which suggested Microsoft may not be involved at all.

And that, in turn, suggested that a second Alan Wake game could be multi-platform.

All we've heard about the future of Alan Wake is that there is one; Remedy told Eurogamer in May this year that more Alan Wake is coming. But the next Alan Wake won't, however, be Alan Wake 2 or DLC.

Does that mean the next Alan Wake will be an iOS or Android game, then? The fifth job advert, for a game programmer, supports that notion.

"As part of the digital team we expect you to live and breathe games and have a real passion towards creating the best game experiences on various platforms," the vacancy read. "The target platforms include iOS & Android, PC and Consoles."

Counted as "beneficial" is experience making PS3, 360 and Wii games; experience with online multiplayer implementation; and experience with the Unity and Unreal game engines.

It could be that Remedy's next Alan Wake project will be an iOS/Android/social title. The "AAA console project" could theoretically, therefore, be Alan Wake 2.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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