Game Entertainment Europe has struck the gong this morning and announced that the European beta for Martial Heroes is now open.

It will take place on a new and exclusive server called Pandora, which has been completely translated into English. In addition to this there will be in-game support from more than 50 Game Master Helpers talking in all sorts of languages, including German, Dutch, French and Polish.

Martial Heroes is an MMORPG based in a parallel medieval Chinese world where Martial Arts is at the centre of everything achieved. You'll get to join the battle between lawful and evil as either an Assassin, Mage, Monk or Warrior.

The game's been available in the Eastern reaches of the world since 2003, and is largely a typical online adventure based around undergoing quests, crafting and climbing an unlimited amount of levels. However, combo attacks resulting in special critical hits and an innovative fame system set it a little apart - which earn you ranks and abilities as you gain reputation.

Martial Heroes also lets you change real life money into in-game currency, giving you access to special items in an online shop. These largely consist things that let you re-specialise your character's abilities, undoing previous errors or even changing your appearance. For 2000 Game Oxygen (in-game currency) you should expect to pay EUR 10.

The game is free to download and play, and can be nabbed from the freshly launched European website. Here you'll also find player rankings, the shop, guides, media, and all the other paraphernalia you'd expect.

Pop over to our Martial Heroes gallery to have a look at the latest screenshots.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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