Wayward Manor

Wayward Manor review

Wayward Manor review

Bump-mapping in the night.

Video games are well suited to explore cruelty. Inside their consequence-less bounds, we're able to persecute, wound and haunt virtual creatures, experiencing the illicit thrill of vindictiveness without the guilt chaser. We smirk as we send oblivious lemmings to their death over the cliff, or when a Pikmin catches fire and begins to skitter and shriek, or when the skater tumbles down the flight of stairs, landing legs akimbo.

In most cases, however, the virtual cruelty is informal, a by-product of our failing to perform the actions required of us by the game's designer. The horror inflicted on a game's characters is merely the collateral damage of our incompetence. Wayward Manor takes a different approach. Here the cruelty is formalised: you play as a ghost, working in cahoots with a grumpy 1920s Gothic manor as you work to drive inhabitants from the premises.

Price and availability

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Neil Gaiman's video game debut Wayward Manor gets a release date

Neil Gaiman's video game debut Wayward Manor gets a release date

Developer The Odd Gentlemen is next working on the Homestuck Game.

Sandman scribe Neil Gaiman's video game debut, Wayward Manor, is coming to PC and Mac via Steam on 15th July, developer The Odd Gentlemen has announced.

Wayward Manor is a puzzle game that puts players in the spectral shoes of a ghost tasked with spooking the new tenants of the titular 1920s New England estate. Think of it like Luigi's Mansion in reverse.

Over 3000 fans supported the partially crowdfunded project when it was announced last autumn. Tablet ports have been announced by publisher Moonshark, though no release date has been set for these.

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