Verdun

With noble intentions but scrappy delivery, Verdun is a bit of a mess.

Video game developers donate portion of sales to War Child

Video game developers donate portion of sales to War Child

World of Tanks, Verdun 1914, Democracy 3 and 1979 Revolution all involved.

A raft of video games are donating a portion of their sales to War Child's Armistice fundraising campaign this month.

The developers of World of Tanks, Verdun 1914, Democracy 3 and 1979 Revolution: Black Friday are all donating a portion of their sales.

War Child's Armistice is a fundraising campaign that encourages peaceful gameplay to support children affected by conflict.

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Verdun review

Verdun review

Battlefield Zero.

On Sunday, I went to Nomansland. I didn't know I was going to Nomansland, in fact I didn't know it even existed as anything other than a concept. And yet that's where I went, as the family and I hunted out a local village fete. Upon arrival, it was fairly clear that there were actually plenty of men in Nomansland, and women too. And cheese rolling. We even saw someone catch an egg that had been thrown over twenty metres. It was a strange Sunday.

Nevertheless, it was only a few days after this unusual trip until I went to No Man's Land, courtesy of M2H and Blackmill Games' WWI squad shooter, Verdun. I'm pretty sure I know which one I preferred.

Yes, on the same week as the Battlefield 1 beta, this tactically astute bit of retail scheduling promises a similar level of century-old combat, but Verdun offers an altogether more grounded, grim and grass-roots take on the Great War. Set in an and around the major theatres of France, here two teams of 16 players battle for control of trenches, as they slowly push the frontline into enemy territory, scrapping for every inch of ground.

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