Subversion

Key events

Prison Architect earns $19m from 1.25m sales - but what's next?

Prison Architect earns $19m from 1.25m sales - but what's next?

"The next game we make will not be about prisons..."

Prison Architect, the game that saved Introversion, did so in spectacular style: to date it has earned more than $19m from over 1.25m sales.

That $19m (and something) figure is accurate as of around 1.30pm (BST) Saturday, 26th September, which is when Introversion founding director Mark Morris shows me it on his phone in some sort of data-tracking app.

The 1.25m sales milestone is mentioned a few times during our interview.

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Prison Architect developer session announced for Rezzed in July

Prison Architect developer session announced for Rezzed in July

Introversion's game also playable on the showfloor. Start of a week of announcements.

Introversion Software, the UK-based developer of PC classics Uplink, Defcon and Darwinia, will be delivering a presentation on its latest game, Prison Architect, at Rezzed next month.

The session will be known as "How Prison Architect rose, phoenix-like, from the still-smouldering ashes of Subversion". The game will also be playable on the show floor for all attendees.

Rezzed: The PC and Indie Games Show takes place at the Brighton Centre on Friday 6th and Saturday 7th July, and Introversion's developer session is currently set for 1pm on the Saturday.

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Introversion announces Prison Architect

Introversion announces Prison Architect

Darwinia dev tackles penal system.

Darwinia developer Introversion has announced a new game called Prison Architect.

In it, you "build and manage a maximum security prison", Introversion's creative mind Chris Delay told Rock Paper Shotgun.

No other Prison Architect details were offered.

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Have videogames lost the plot?

A look at why games don't tell good stories.

Despite the advances of the past decade, from physics engines and motion control to near photo-realistic graphics, there is one area in which games still have huge scope for improvement. Why, after all this time, are so many videogames still so bad at telling stories?

Introversion opens up on Subversion

Infiltration game with roots in Uplink.

Introversion's Chris Delay has detailed the indie developer's next game Subversion on the company forums, revealing it to be a game of infiltration and espionage in which the player commands a team of operatives moving through a hostile high security building.