Scarface: The World Is Yours

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Scarface: The World Is Yours

Scarface: The World Is Yours

Coke with a twist.

Imagine my disappointment. Here I was, all excited because I thought I was going to review Scarf Ace, the cult Japanese knitting game that uses the Wii's motion sensing to realistically simulate the joys of furiously click-clacking giant needles like a mad old biddy. Instead, it's shouty swearbox Al Pacino and yet another attempt to recreate joypad-centred gameplay through the medium of motion-sensing. Hmm.

Luckily, Scarface was one of the better efforts to emerge from 2006's brief flurry of unlikely licensed free-roaming crime games, earning a reasonable 7/10 from Kristan back in October of 2006. Taking the bold approach of following on from the movie, and suggesting that Al Pacino's cocky Cuban crimelord survived the apocalyptic raid on his Miami mansion, the stage is set for a devious journey into larger-than-life violent excess and enough potty mouth to make Gordon Ramsay wince.

The basic set-up is, of course, familiar from the GTA series. Walk around, get in cars, shoot people, drive to hot spots to start missions which either propel the story forwards or provide the cash needed to amass a killer arsenal. Where Scarface excels is in giving you several compelling reasons to jump through the hoops one more time - not least of which is Tony Montana himself. By casting you as such a legendary persona, and then taking everything away from you, there's added impetus to rebuilding your empire. Perfectly animated and voiced with just the right mixture of Pacino accuracy and cartoony pastiche, this is a character you'll believe deserves to rule the world. So seeing Montana getting dissed by cheesy nightclub patrons just ain't right - and your quest to reclaim your reputation as well as your worldly possessions is nicely judged. The better you do, the more the citizens of Miami quake at your approach. And it feels good.

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Sierra Showcase

Hands-on with Crash and Scarface on Wii, and SWAT on PSP.

Sometimes people just can't decide what you should call them. Take Prince Rogers Nelson. For years, the purple one was happy being called simply 'Prince'. Then it was TAFKAP, The Artist, or at one stage just a ludicrous squiggle. Vivendi Games is another prime example. Down the years it's been Sierra, Cendent, Havas, Vivendi Universal, sometimes VU Games, now Vivendi Games. Except it isn't. Oh the confusion. And then we get whisked off to a US press event in San Francisco and told that in no uncertain terms that this is Sierra Games and that we should refer to it as such. Mercy.

Scarface: The World is Yours

Scarface: The World is Yours

Jack Thompson: here's one for you.

Just when you thought the world had enough GTA-style games for one month, up pops another one to jump aboard the ever-lucrative bandwagon of crime-fuelled gang-busting empire-building epics.

But wait! This one's actually quite interesting in the way Scarface openly pays homage to a game that openly paid homage to Scarface. We like the symmetry. We're sure Rockstar does too.

What fans of the 1983 Al Pacino movie might not particularly appreciate is quite how Radical Entertainment has conspired to make a game out of the subject matter. Normally in this situation, developers take one of two routes; either a semi-faithful linear interpretation with a few embellishments thrown in (Spider-Man 2), or one 'inspired' by the movie's universe (like, say, The Chronicles of Riddick). But here, Radical goes for Plan B and goes all 'what if?' on us and risks the whole project's credibility before we've even put the disk in the drive.

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Scarface PSP details

Scarface PSP details

VU confirms no 360 version.

Vivendi has outlined plans for the PSP version of Scarface and admitted that the game, based on the iconic 80s film, will not appear on Xbox 360.

As we told you earlier this year, the PSP game, in development at FarSight Studios, is a separate entity to the console versions and adopts a different name. It's due out in October.

While Scarface: The World Is Yours (PS2, Xbox, PC) is set in the aftermath of the screenplay (even resurrecting Tony Montana), "Scarface: Money. Power. Respect." on PSP is more of a strategy title and mirrors events in the film.

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Scarface cast announced

Scarface cast announced

James Woods! Ice-T! Gervais!

Vivendi has unveiled the cast list for Scarface: The World is Yours, revealing that several actors who starred in the original movie will also appear in the game.

That won't include Pacino himself, since - as a Vivendi bigwig told us recently - he's getting on a bit and isn't able to do the voice any more. But you can expect to see Robert Loggia, who plays Frank Lopez, Steven Bauer (Manny Ribera) and Al Israel (Hector the Toad).

You'll also see Pacino's likeness in the game. Tony Montana's voice will be provided by an actor who was hand picked by Mr P himself, and who does rather a good job at it actually.

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Scarface: The World Is Yours

Radical Entertainment talks tough.

It's half past ten in the morning, UK time, and we're standing by a pool in the Spanish sunshine, being offered champagne by a parade of bronzed models sporting the itsy-bitsiest of bikinis and the highest of high heels.

Scarface: The World Is Yours

Say hello to our little preview.

Few GTA 'inspired' titles deserve to get away with borrowing ideas wholesale as much as Scarface. How so? Well, for a start Rockstar's multi gazillion-selling Vice City was virtually a homage to the Al Pacino movie, while the seminal GTA III featured almost the entire movie soundtrack. In an 'Indiana Jones borrowing from Tomb Raider' display of justifiable mindshare payback, Tony Montana is spraying an M16 in the direction of Tommy Vercetti, if you will.

Pacino is the face of, er, Scarface

Major-league cast of stars signs on for latest movie to game foray.

A wide range of Hollywood talent has been announced for Vivendi Universal Games' forthcoming adaptation of gangster movie Scarface, with Al Pacino's likeness - although not his voice - set to be used for the iconic central character.