Exit

Exit

Exit

The great escape.

There's something intrinsically likeable about Exit - so much so, in fact, that it's hard to approach the game without desperately wanting to like it. Whether it's the wonderfully eccentric art style, the sense of humour that suggests a mind somewhat askew, or simply the fact that it's a puzzle game that isn't another bloody variation on bloody Tetris, we're not sure. Perhaps it's a bit of all three.

Just as well, then, that Exit's beauty is somewhat more than skin deep. What we have here, in fact, is a lovely - but flawed - specimen of Xbox Live Arcade title, an endearing little puzzle game whose slip-ups are largely forgivable on account of its ready charm.

If you've already bought the PSP version, which appeared at the start of summer, then all you'll want to know is this - it's the same game, but in nice-looking high definition, and it might have downloadable content down the line. On the other hand, if Exit is new to you; well, allow me to introduce you to my new friend.

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TGS: Xbox Live Arcade Roundup

Ikaruga, Every Extend Extra, Exit and more.

Tucked away on one side of Microsoft's genuinely very impressive TGS stand was a bank of four 360 demo pods exclusively devoted to Xbox Live titles. And when we say 'titles' we mean about 50 of the blessed things. Old stuff. New stuff. Indiscriminate stuff. It was like inviting round a mate who's been away for a couple of years and showing him everything he'd missed. Xbox Live Arcade really does have an embarrassment of riches now.

Exit

Exit

This way to puzzle heaven?

It's nice to find an original game that's designed so intuitively. Exit subtly reminds you of so many games you might wistfully recall playing into the wee hours; it's as comfortable as slipping on your battered old jeans. Taito's puzzle/platformer centres on the character of Mr. ESC: in fact 'character' is certainly the only word to use. The aptly named Mr. ESC is a professional escapologist and a mercenary rescue worker (someday that'll be my job description). There's no more development needed, really.

To The Rescue

The aim throughout is to use Mr. ESC's unique skills to save disaster victims from almost-certain, side-scrolling doom. The game is divided into ten levels, each with ten individual stages, which means (for the mathematically challenged) 100 levels to contort a human brain through - with another 100 for download if you can take it (though how long before we see them here is the question).

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