Fragile first impressions Page 3

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  • Der_tolle_Emil 23 Jan 2009 18:52:18 7,299 posts
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    I have had a bit more time now and read it. It sounds very good. Presentation sounds top notch and it's nice to hear that there are survival horror games without the typical survival horror combat.

    Wasn't this already confirmed for a release outside of Japan? I really want it :/
  • figaro7 23 Jan 2009 20:21:26 1,362 posts
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    Sounds great, heres hoping for a pal release!
  • Telepathic.Geometry 23 Jan 2009 21:52:50 11,277 posts
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    Oh God, I'm so fucking drunk. Looks like I have to buy Fragile tomorrow morning though. Cheers Jin. @mowgli: .

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  • Binny 23 Jan 2009 22:18:06 187 posts
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    Yeap, I've had a few too matey but not as many as you if your on about getting Fragile tomorrow! It's not going to be released in Europe for a while yet.

    Enjoy your night fella!
  • Deleted user 23 January 2009 22:21:10
    But TG lives in Japan, donchaknow.
  • Telepathic.Geometry 23 Jan 2009 22:25:42 11,277 posts
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    I'm so drunk, I wouldn't be surprised if I woke up in my place in Galway with about forty thousand fucking traffic cones. :)

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  • absolutezero 23 Jan 2009 23:03:22 7,956 posts
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    JinTypeNoir wrote:
    So it's finally here! The new game from the makers of cult PS2 RPGs Venus & Braves and Seven, tag-teamed with the sound designers for the Baten Kaitos games and Trusty Bell.

    I got it earlier today and have had some time to dig in.

    Why it seems polished

    My very first impression is that's there is lots of polish over everything. Every environment has a lot of incidental detail to it that you can explore that kinds of adds to the setting. You never seem to just go to a place and go into rooms that look like other rooms. Sound design is surprising, as they use the Wii remote for lots of cool sound things, some of them really liable to give you a shock when all of a sudden and it's been so quiet. One of my favorites is that one of the enemies are the ghosts of children with half their bodies missing and when you hit them, they scream out little children's games and jeers dialogue. Also, when you interact with something in the environment the Wiimote will give a slight vibration to let you know. Voice acting is impressive and the actors really deliver a lot of emotion and weight to their lines.

    Even the options menu looks gorgeous, with little hand-drawn silhouettes of things on a faded parchment for the background. The in-game menus show the same attention to detail. It's a very interesting art style that reminds of 50s style advertisements with their saturated color, but faded in time. There is plenty of optional stuff to interact with and the game has a quick, snappy pace. There is lots of storyline and stuff related to it you can explore, but no long cutscenes, at least so far.

    Paragraph by paragraph description of the starting story, gameplay sections, tutorials and cutscenes

    So after you click start, the first thing you're greeted with is this wavering blue miasma that looks like a bubble floating around the screen. It gradually opens up and becomes clearer, showing a cloudy daytime sky. You can hear something being scraped or somebody digging. Seto, the main character, explains that he lived with an old man whose name he never knew until this summer when he died and now he's completely alone. The beautiful scenery transitions into a whole bunch of black and white scattery lines that is a little startling.

    When it clears, Seto is in an observatory next to a telescope at night. The moonlight is shining a bit into the room through a mostly closed observatory dome. Seto remarks that if he opened up the dome he could see better. There's a little tutorial screen teaching you that if you hold B and wave the Wii remote you can look around in first person. There is a green marker that shows where you are pointing the Wiimote at all times. If you can interact with something it flashes. These are another cute detail because they have little funny remarks written around the screenshots.

    You open the observatory door by doing this. And now you can explore the observatory, a little more fully, but not entirely because there is a library that is darker and needs a light to see in. So you're off to find one. As you explore, you can see how Seto and the old man used to live at this place. There's an age/height chart where the old man tracked Seto's growth on the wall, you can see where Seto drew pictures of people's faces as a kid, there's a moon chart on one wall, when you examine the television, Seto remarks that it's a mysterious object that looks like a mirror. It really seems like a game that will reward thorough and slow-paced exploration with lots of story detail.

    When you climb up the observatory, you can walk on the huge telescope to get to where there's little bed in the rafters. Here you'll find your first and weakest of the flashlights. The game tells you how to control it (simply swing the Wiimote round to look where you want) and adds that if there is an item in the environment, fireflies will be flying around it, so to keep a look out.

    With the flashlight you can go explore the library. Just as you're about to find something near one of the desks a weird, metallic voice shouts out something like, "What a pain. I thought he'd finally died, but it looks like there's still life left here." The game explains attacking (very Zelda-like, right down to the "eh, AH, EIY!" sound effects for the three hit combo) and a weird stone mask with blood dripping out of its eyes and some jelly like substance on the back floats toward you. You can see your hit points on the left and its on the right. About seven whacks later, it disappears, and Seto's like, "What the hell?"

    Going back to what's on the desk. It's actually a lamentful letter from the old man. It seems he was a pessimist and never really saw the point in living. He feels there was nothing he could do to atone (for what?) and apologizes to Seto for not really being much of a person. He says if you head east, you'll see a large red tower. It's possible that someone else is alive there and encourages Seto to head to the tower. He also leaves behind a blue stone. As Seto reads the letter and hears the old man confess his regrets and apologize to him, his voice starts to waver with emotion and eventually it trails off until its replaced by what can be presumed to be the old man. For just fifteen minutes into the game, it's very powerful.

    Then the opening video plays. It uses the full version of the vocal song heard in the trailers and it is impossible to describe in words how remarkable it is. It's mysterious, forelorn, desperate, bright and vivid.

    Underneath the foreground of a streetlight overgrown with leaves and vegetation, he walks past a street. Further on there's a long, yellow bus sunk into a tall ocean of brilliant green grass and buildings pecked with moss and holes. He drinks some tap water that's barely trickling out of a fawcet and then after a few sips the water fawcet spurts out nothing but black, gooey guck. The scenes play on, showing normal city scenery and then slowly aging it until it looks like now, with the usual parts of our life rotting, falling apart, vegetation overcoming everything.

    As Seto walks, he looks up at the moon. The screen switches to the girl in the red tower looking at a cat's eye. There any number of switches between the two perspectives, establishing that they are connected somehow. As the scenes continue, day slides into sunset and that into night. It's all very well linked to the lyrics as well. Last, a sole purple firefly rests on the girl's shoulder as she sleeps and we see Seto appear in a city nearer to the tower, with a host of purple fireflies around him.

    This is where you get control again. You walk around a bit until you find that a place where a huge subway sign has crashed down and there's a little lake of clear blue water with many glowing lotus pads on it. As you walk, you can hear her singing and then you see the girl on top of one of the fallen signs, singing a nonsense song about the moon and light. As you walk up, Seto steps on a child's toy and the noise it makes frightens her, she falls off and hits her head on the ground. Seto walks up and touches her face, thinking she's dead and then seems shocked by what he feels. She gets up and says, "You touched me." He seems equally surprised. She runs off before he can introduce himself and he runs after her into the subway.

    Then there's another gorgeous interlude where Seto seems to be describing his impressions from the future. He explains that he passed many people on his way to the red tower, but that they all passed through him like phantoms. When he touched the girl, he was very surprised, because her face was warm (similarly, she might be, as his hand would have been warm too). He explains how this left a deep impression on him, being the second person he's met in his 15 year life who is alive. All the while, this gorgeous moving painting is being displayed of her black silhouette amidst the silhouette of many lotus flowers, the bottom ripples like a lake, where the top where a burning sunset of clouds is, shimmers like heat and surreal red and purples flow through the entire thing, while the silhouette of a frog jump off the pad into a lake, just like Basho's poem. At the same time, Seto's thoughts end with a Japanese poem of his own. All the while a nice little piano ditty is playing.

    And you're off to explore the subway and find the girl again.

    More on the general gameplay. It's basically a combination of the slow exploration of a survival horror game with the basic Zelda mechanics and the RPG elements of a dungeon hack.

    The RPG elements

    You gain experience and level up in the normal way, weapons have different strengths and weaknesses, you can sell loot you find in the ruins to gain gold, but you won't know what some of it is until you appraise it by looking at it in a fireplace, which serve as the game's rest and save spots. What's cool is that a lot of these items have little stories behind them that you figure out by looking at them under firelight (the little stories are even voice-acted!) and again, it's yet another aspect that adds greatly to the atmosphere. You have limited space in your on-hand inventory and bag, and must choose what to bring with you. Just like a lot of PC RPGs or Resident Evil 4, each item has a size that is represented in square blocks and you rotate and fit them into a rectangle that will fit. This is the RPG part.

    Why it feels like Zelda
    There are various traps and things you have to avoid in the ruins, like crumbling floors where you have to walk slowly to avoid them breaking up on you. The various weapons and the way you fight enemies is very similar to the 3D Zelda's in complexity and aiming mode, except there's more levels of weapons and you've got a growing HP system. As well, there are ghosts and other sentient beings that encompany you as companions that can help out, like Navi or Midna. If you hold the Wii remote up near your ear while playing, the companion will give you a hint from the Wiimote speaker. The layout of the various ruins also really resembles the slightly creepy atmosphere that many 3D Zelda games can engender. As well, there's some puzzle solving and item searching involved just like a Zelda dungeon. It also uses the Zelda dynamic changing music style to great effect.

    How it resembles survival horror

    It resembles a survival horror game in that it's rather strict in how much the main character can do and the enemies are generally faster and better fighters than you can be. However, it's not really quite to the level of something like Silent Hill where your character clumsy, it's more that Seto is weak. That said, it's not hard either, but a great deal of the monsters can't be seen until you use your flashlight on them, so that adds some tension to the affair, especially since you can stun or slow them down with light. It's all like survival horror in the map setup, right down to how their displayed when you get them in the menu. Checking the map for places you haven't been and going to them, carefully exploring with your flashlight to find plot hints and triggers to make the game move on, or discovering event scenes. It works well with the RPG part, since you've got the basic idea of a dungeon hack's resource management of items. As well, there's thick atmosphere draped on everything so it's not like a typical random dungeon that you can just charge on through. You also get different flashlights which have different effects that you must use and this feels very survival horror-ish, especially aftering playing Zero 4. There are also several parts of the game where you have to find something going by how loud or weak the sound in the Wiimote is coming off, searching until it gets loud enough to know you're near it, kind of like the hot and cold game.

    The most impressive survival horror-y element however is the graffiti on the walls. After the game was announced, Namco held a contest to write graffiti that would appear on the game's walls. There's a lot of it and it greatly adds to the atmosphere to discover and read it. Some of it is chillling, some if it is basically incomprehensible but tugs at something just beyond memory, some of it is cute and some of it is really, really memorably shocking. Either way, it's yet another great way the game builds on its world.

    Conclusion

    I'm still pretty much near the beginning of the game, but so far so very impressive. It's basically what I guess a pre-RE4 survival horror action RPG would be if it wasn't so much scary as it was atmospheric and haunting.

    tl;dr
  • Phattso Moderator 23 Jan 2009 23:08:13 13,209 posts
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    You wrote all that when only "pretty much near the beginning of the game"?! Get to fuck.
  • Binny 23 Jan 2009 23:09:20 187 posts
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    deathgibbon wrote:
    But TG lives in Japan, donchaknow.

    Ah sorry TG. Looked at your location & it said Ireland so that's where my confusion came from.

    Enjoy Fragile tomorrow you lucky bastard.
  • MrTomFTW Moderator 23 Jan 2009 23:09:29 37,379 posts
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    absolutezero wrote:
    tl;dr
    Bugger, I was going to write that.

    Follow me on Twitter: @MrTom
    Voted by the community "Best mod" 2011, 2012 and 2013.

  • Deleted user 23 January 2009 23:10:35
    Jin, with some lessons in brevity you could publish your reviews or send them to other companies. They are very good but just ridiculously long.
  • JinTypeNoir 24 Jan 2009 14:20:21 4,365 posts
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    A little farther along now, and I know I said it's like survival horror, but not meant to be scary before.

    I take that back now. The "it's not scary" part.
  • Tonka 24 Jan 2009 15:14:51 20,025 posts
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    Are you into post apocalyptic books or movies normally?

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • JinTypeNoir 24 Jan 2009 15:29:47 4,365 posts
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    Depends on the book or movie. There's one out in Japan right now called Kansen Rettou (Infected Islands) and it looks awful, so I'm not going to see it. On the other hand, I read two books late last year about the subject. I also like to explore abandoned buildings with friends (preferably at night).

    Due to this game however, I never want to play Hide and Seek again.
  • Telepathic.Geometry 24 Jan 2009 15:31:33 11,277 posts
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    I tried to buy it today, but it wasn't to be found. :( Advertising: Check. Game: Nope. x_o

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  • Tonka 24 Jan 2009 16:15:59 20,025 posts
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    JinTypeNoir wrote:
    Depends on the book or movie. I read two books late last year about the subject.

    I was wondering if you could compare the mood in the game to some film or book. Preferably western...

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • JinTypeNoir 24 Jan 2009 16:50:53 4,365 posts
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    Hmmm. Let's see. Not much I can think of. Most of the Western movies I've seen on the subject are like this. For a Western film, it's more along the lines of science fiction with a strong city theme like some (SOME) parts of the art direction in City of Lost Children or Dark City.

    As for Western novels, all I can think of is those parts in The Time Machine where the time traveler goes into the far future and discovers the fate of humanity. Another example would be this science fiction story I read about astronauts trying to communicate with a Martian they find while exploring the harsh desert lands of Mars.

    I guess after all, Fragile owes a lot more to the Japanese traditions of apocalyptic story-telling.
  • Sean.Aaron 25 Jan 2009 12:47:44 2,531 posts
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    Jin, for those of us whose knowledge of Japanese is weak, how essential is it to playing -- I imagine we'd miss out on some story -- is it basically pointless or is the gameplay itself doable without Japanese?
  • Deleted user 25 January 2009 12:51:40
    Do you have a Japanese Wii Sean?
  • Telepathic.Geometry 25 Jan 2009 13:10:20 11,277 posts
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    @Sean: I failed to find Fragile yet again today, but for what it's worth, I'm pretty sure it'll be essential to solving puzzles. Obviously, Jin'll know better, but I'm pretty sure not knowing too much Japanese will make it unplayable.

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  • JinTypeNoir 25 Jan 2009 14:07:57 4,365 posts
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    It would seem slightly pointless if you don't know Japanese. It's not a very tricky game, so you could get by with trial and error, but I imagine it would get very irritating without a clear idea of what's going on and seeing as most of the rewarding elements of the game revolve around understanding text or speech.

    You'd also probably not be able to take in a lot of the storyline and this is a very heavily story-focused game.
  • Sean.Aaron 25 Jan 2009 16:30:28 2,531 posts
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    Fair enough. One to wait for localisation or the mythical day when I'm better able to understand Japanese.

    Just for clarification, could you get by on reading comprehension alone (to widen the scope, would a deaf person proficient in Japanese be able to play the game)?
  • JinTypeNoir 25 Jan 2009 16:33:08 4,365 posts
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    No unfortunately. There are areas where you have to follow spoken Japanese directions that come out of the Wiimote and get louder or smaller based on how close you are, and they don't have subtitles.
  • Sean.Aaron 25 Jan 2009 17:52:19 2,531 posts
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    Cool. It does sound like a very interesting game. Let's see if a Western publisher is ambitious enough to localise it. Why oh why doesn't Namco have overseas publishing operations (I guess they do in North America, but do they do anything console-related?)?
  • JinTypeNoir 25 Jan 2009 18:02:40 4,365 posts
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    How did you guys get Pac-man if Namco doesn't do their own stuff elsewhere? I hear they're pretty much like Square Enix or Konami or Koei in the States.

    Actually, what bothers me, is they merged with Bandai. Bandai is a worldwide toy company, I know they have offices all over Europe. Why don't they use that?

    You would think that like Square used Enix's publishing and merchandising arm and Enix used Square's worldwide localization arm when they merged, they would use Bandai's ginormous branch offices to their advantage.
  • Sean.Aaron 26 Jan 2009 12:01:13 2,531 posts
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    Midway and Atari Games distributed the arcade games (in fact Midway created Ms. Pac-Man in-house if I'm not mistaken, but Namco owned the rights to the game). I think the first Namco-branded game I ever laid eyes on in the States was Point Blank. It was years before I knew Namco created Pac-Man, Mappy, Bosconian, Dig Dug, etc.

    Namco Museum Remix in PAL territories is published by Atari -- keeping that historic tie alive! Of course this is the main reason I despair of seeing Fragile localised. Ubisoft or Nintendo are the only likely candidates to me. Atari has history, but I think their survival depends on how well their upcoming slate of titles sell, so I would be surprised if they took on the challenge. Hence the thinking that it'll be a year+ before we get a glimpse.
  • Sean.Aaron 6 Feb 2009 16:08:27 2,531 posts
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    IGN seems confident of this getting a Stateside release at a minimum, but given the amount of work involved in localisation, maybe not this year. I admire their confidence; if Namco-Bandai North America announced it I would feel more confident in someone like Atari or Ubisoft bringing it to Europe.


    Publisher movement so far: Very little. Namco's U.S. subsidiary recently revealed to IGN that it has no current plans to release the game in America this year. Meanwhile, Xseed Games, which has made a name for itself by picking up high-profile Japanese releases, said it had looked at the title and found it to be very interesting. There is also hope that a major third-party publisher like Ubisoft, which recently released Tenchu: Shadow Assassins in America (and before that, No More Heroes) might try to nab Fragile for U.S. release, but absolutely no evidence whatsoever to support such hope.

    Local release probability: High. Fragile just debuted in Japan and translation will take time. We're keeping our fingers crossed that Namco, about to bring over Klonoa (which shipped in Japan previously) to America, will give Fragile the same treatment and get it to U.S. shores this year, despite its current plan. If Namco passes, we'd be shocked if a company like Xseed or Ubisoft didn't pick it up immediately. In fact, when we contacted Xseed about Fragile for this feature, a company spokesperson offered: "Officially, can't really say much, but it looks amazing. It is something that we are interested in, but that's pretty much all we can say right now."

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