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Digital Foundry seeks video production staff

DF's YouTube plans revealed - and what it means for Eurogamer.

Digital Foundry is searching for a new staff member - a video producer/presenter - making it as good a time as any to talk in depth about future plans for the channel, how we plan to expand and what the push into the video space means for our presence here on Eurogamer.

For years now, there's been internal discussion about the best way to do more with Digital Foundry. We've often talked about launching a standalone site, mirroring and expanding upon the work we do here at Eurogamer, producing more articles with the more extensive resources and budgets we'd have available. But the bottom line is this: Eurogamer's editors - Tom Bramwell and his successor, Oli Welsh - have been generous to a fault when it comes to supporting what we do, no matter how crazy some of the initial concepts we come up with. In terms of the staples, we already cover every major game in-depth and pursue every smaller scale story we have an interest in writing about. On top of that, in the last couple of years, Eurogamer has backed DF extensively in developing a unique approach to covering PC hardware - my current passion project.

We won't rule out a standalone site at some point in the future but in the meantime, what's become clear is that somehow we have already managed to attract another audience - on YouTube. Historically, we've used the world's largest video provider as little more than a hosting service for our article embeds, just uploading videos with no real context or explanation. Yet somehow, we've accrued 83m views and 120,000 subscribers - a large, very different, rapidly expanding audience we're not properly looking after. So internally, the discussion shifted: given sufficient resources, what could we do with video to make the most of this opportunity?

The pitch is straightforward enough. Video means we can tell different kinds of stories and cover technology in a very different way. Gadgets, laptops, graphics cards - in fact, any kind of hardware takes on a new dimension when you can show it, handle it, test it and discuss it on camera. On top of that, we've set up a new office, centralised resources and for the first time, we'll be able to take you behind the scenes - you'll see how we work, we'll reveal our tools and you'll learn about our techniques. Digital Foundry has always been something of a black box - games and hardware go in, articles and videos come out - but what actually happens in the middle is sometimes just as interesting.

Digital Foundry's push into video should hopefully see an increase in Eurogamer content. For example, we put together this video on ultra-wide 21:9 aspect ratio PC gaming, which inspired us to produce a much larger, more in-depth text article that we'll be publishing on the weekend.

So what does this mean for Eurogamer? Well, we've been working on the transition for some months now, and despite many behind-the-scenes challenges, we've managed to maintain momentum and our year-by-year growth continues to be very healthy. Whatever happens with video, we're just as committed to producing the articles we're passionate about as we ever have been. Digital Foundry video posts may appear on the Eurogamer feed, but it's equally as likely that a video we produce will birth a more detailed article on the site.

For example, check our recent video on ultra-wide 21:9 aspect ratio PC displays embedded above: the work we did there forms the basis for a much more in-depth piece we're publishing soon. Conversely, while we're aiming to produce new, original video content, text articles we've previously produced could be re-factored for our new audience too, once properly adapted for the medium. But the bottom line is this: there are no plans to reduce Digital Foundry's presence on Eurogamer - if anything, we hope to post more.

But to make all of this work, we need new blood - a new staff member with a passion for games and tech, but offering us a new perspective as we target a wider audience. For those interested in applying, the job spec is below. If you think you qualify and you're up for the challenge, click through to gamesindustry.biz and apply. There are exciting times ahead and whether you're reading, watching or helping us to produce it, you're in for a treat.

Gamer Network is seeking a presenter to join the Digital Foundry tech channel as it expands into video, building upon its current 120,000 YouTube subscriber base.

Digital Foundry is known for its unique, in-depth analysis of games and gaming technology. While an understanding of its existing content is an advantage, the primary objective here is to expand and engage the audience, demystifying the work the channel does, showcasing new gaming technology and using video to tell the kinds of story not possible on conventional web media.

As well as being the 'face' of the video channel, the successful applicant will work directly with the editorial team in its Essex office, generating ideas and helping to film content, and should be au fait with the games and hardware markets. Cultivating and maintaining relationships within the industry is also a key part of the job, but over and above this, a passion for gaming and technology is absolutely crucial.

DIY or die Why people are still making NES games. DIY or die

Responsibilities Include:

  • Creating innovative video content, fresh ideas and stories with the Digital Foundry team.
  • Planning and executing video content, creating scripts and working with the filming/editing staff.
  • Liaising with the industry to obtain software/hardware and cultivate relationships.
  • Working to an agreed schedule and producing content on time and to budget.

Required Skills and Experience:

  • A strong passion for gaming and gaming technology.
  • Presenting experience in front of camera.
  • Experience in the PC hardware and/or gaming space, preferably in a journalism capacity.
  • Experience with video production tools such as Adobe Creative Suite.
  • The ability to generate fresh ideas and tell new stories about games, gaming performance and hardware.

Desirable Skills and Experience:

  • Contacts in the gaming and PC space are an advantage, but not essential.

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