Rate the last film you watched out of 100 Page 2169

  • Page

    of 2844 First / Last

  • nickthegun 20 Mar 2013 09:35:18 61,057 posts
    Seen 17 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    Because it has a guy with a gun standing in a field?

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • mikeck 20 Mar 2013 09:41:35 1,936 posts
    Seen 59 minutes ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    @Lotos8ter Definitely not Drive on motorbikes...though the first half hour will lead you to believe that, it's a slow burn (but damn good).
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 09:46:31
    khaz wrote:
    Yes, you are being pedantic. :)

    I don't see why it has to be always the American west when there are excellent films that are very much Westerns regardless of location.

    And that both Yojimbo and Seven Samurai were remade into Westerns says it all really. All they did was change the location and time period. Some of the social commentary in Seven Samurai was lost/dropped in The Magnificent Seven but aside from that, it and A Fistful of Dollars are virtually identical.

    And I prefer Peckinpah's westerns to Leone's as well.
    :)

    To flip the argument round, would you describe Fistful of Dollars and Magnificent Seven as Samurai films? Is it as pedantic to suggest that a Samurai film has to be about Samurai as it is to suggest a Western has to be set in the West?

    Perhaps not, and as nick says this really is classic wanky first year film school student territory, but for me the appeal of Westerns is very much linked to the setting and atmosphere of the West, and while I like Samurai/Kurosawa films also, I like then for very different reasons, despite the similarities in theme and plot. To that end, I wouldn't describe Kurosawa films as Westerns as imo the defining reason why Westerns are Westerns is their setting.
  • nickthegun 20 Mar 2013 09:55:28 61,057 posts
    Seen 17 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    Django Kill is awesome.

    As is Django.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 09:55:36
    I have btw heard the phrase "Eastern" used a number of times you describe films like Yojimbo. Seems a neat way of getting round the issue.
  • Blakester 20 Mar 2013 09:57:02 3,652 posts
    Seen 12 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Wild Bill is an excellent "Western".

    When you can't see the angles on the wall you're in trouble.

  • khaz 20 Mar 2013 10:03:43 2,826 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    Interesting. I suppose some Westerns I could describe as samurai films. Many of the lone gun Westerns follow very similar patterns to samurai films/heroes.

    Similar locations - rural, oppressed, downtrodden ; similar code of honour, redemption through action, a sense of isolation, etc.

    Kurosawa himself took inspiration from John Ford and many of Ford's themes and ideas transplanted directly into his films. And then the favour was repeated again when several directors openly cited Kurosawa as a direct influence. The fact that so many themes and ideas are interchangeable between the two genres shows the level of comfort they share.

    Also, you seem to see the Western genre as quite literally just that, set in the west. I see it more as a set of ideas that could work regardless of location and time. At least, that's how I read it.

    One of my favourite westerns - Sholay - is an Indian take on Seven Samurai. And its fucking brilliant with a villain that overshadows both the Seven Samurai and Magnificent Seven. And the social themes of Seven Samurai transplant directly into the rural Indian setting with virtually no change. Its way more pulpy than its forebears but works the better for it but you can tell what its inspirations are clearly.

    Edited by khaz at 10:07:18 20-03-2013
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 10:15:17
    There's obviously no correct answer here, and most conversations about genres end up this way. The thing about genres is that they are by nature a very "generic" description, and therefore the subtleties and complexities of what films are really about tend to be missed. Films that themselves are not generic become incredibly difficult to categorise - for example is Let the Right One in a horror movie or a love story, or something else?

    For me though you have to be as literal as possible with stating genres, as that's kind of the point of them. I would recommend Let the Right One in to my brother who is a fan of horror, but I wouldn't recommend it to my mum who likes love stories.

    Similarly, I would hesittiate to reccomend Yojimbo to someone looking for a Western, or at least I'd certainly explain a little of what kind of film it is beyond being (debatably) a "Western". If that person is like me and likes Westerns for their setting (Western), they may well end up being as horrified as my mum would be watching Let the Right One in expecting Gone with the Wind.
  • khaz 20 Mar 2013 10:25:05 2,826 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    Damn you last son of Krypton.

    See, I would recommend Yojimbo to someone looking for a good Western (Although not as my first choice) but I wouldn't recommend Let the Right One In to someone looking for a love story. :(

    Btw, you'll like the look of this then if you liked Let the Right One In: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3ErWNBX9Rc

    Edited by khaz at 10:29:02 20-03-2013
  • Subquest 20 Mar 2013 10:27:41 318 posts
    Seen 57 minutes ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Les Miserables - Surprisingly, I thought this was excellent. Really strong performances, some wonderfully emotional scenes, great singing on the whole. I've seen the stage show, but I thought they told the story just as well, if not better. 9/10.

    Hobbit - I actually quite enjoyed this too, despite not expecting to. More LOTR fare, looks amazing, an enjoyable romp 8/10.
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 10:33:02
    Again, perhaps the "Eastern" definition is the way to solve this one.

    In fact a little hunt around reveals there are several sub-genres that are in common)ish) usage:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid_Western

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_Western

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostern

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revisionist_Western

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zapata_Western

    And of course, "spagetti westerns" are a widely recognised sub-genre in themselves.
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 10:37:57
    khaz wrote:
    Btw, you'll like the look of this then if you liked Let the Right One In: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3ErWNBX9Rc
    Yeah that looks good.

    Lindqvist (writer of Let the Right One In) has actually written a zombie book called Handling the Undead. Its not quite a love story in the same way that Let the Right One In is, but it's a very different take on the whole zombie thing. It's kind of a realistic story of how society would react to the dead coming back to life. The zombies aren't uncontrollably dangerous in it, and it's more about the sociological and practical implications.

    It's very interesting but also really incredibly horrible and upsetting, particularly the focus on parents whose dead children come back :(

    Edited by kalel at 10:38:18 20-03-2013
  • nickthegun 20 Mar 2013 10:43:49 61,057 posts
    Seen 17 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    A film was optioned before the book even came out, iirc, but its still in development hell.

    Shame because its an excellent book, but its not a huge surprise they are having trouble turning it into a film.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • Gartt 20 Mar 2013 10:45:05 1,848 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    I'll pipe in on the Western conversation, Kurosawa was, as khaz said, was heavily influenced by American westerns, especially John ford,and I think it really does come across in his films, visually and thematically. There's an odd juxtaposition between the american west and classical Japan, both being very unstable politically and violent. So stories can transfer well in either direction.

    Although personally i wouldnt really call Kurosawa films westerns, I think he was influenced and fascinated by other cultures, his take on Shakespeare in Throne of blood for example.

    Back on topic, going by the logic can you really call an Italian Western a western?
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 10:45:19
    It was kind of excellent I suppose. It was very well written and imaginad. I got absolutely no enjoyment whatsoever from it though.
  • Gartt 20 Mar 2013 10:45:40 1,848 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Oh and Sholay really is awesome and worth a look.
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 10:46:57
    Gartt wrote:

    Back on topic, going by the logic can you really call an Italian Western a western?
    Of course, they're set in the American west. Where they are filmed is irrelevant.

    Otherwise LotR isn't a fantasy film because it wasn't actually filmed in Middle Earth.
  • Gartt 20 Mar 2013 10:54:35 1,848 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Is that the only requirement to be called a Western?
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 10:57:03
    Again, this comes down to what defines a genre, so no, but if a film is set in the west and is about cowboys and what have you, then yeah, it's a western.
  • nickthegun 20 Mar 2013 10:57:46 61,057 posts
    Seen 17 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    Sub genre- spaghetti western

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • nickthegun 20 Mar 2013 10:58:31 61,057 posts
    Seen 17 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    Sub-sub-genre - Sergio Leone Spaghetti Westerns.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 11:03:40
    Yes, but some sub-genres are more obviously part of the larger genre than others. Spaghetti Westerns are very obviously westerns. You wouldn't even know they weren't filmed in the actual West of America if you weren't informed. Show the first scene of Once Upon a Time in the West to pretty much anyone who doesn't really know much about Westerns, and they'd say it was a Western.

    Equally the uninformed would be (imo) unlikely to watch the first scene of Yojimbo and define it as one.

    I don't really think I'm being all that pedantic here. I can see the argument for the potential definitions of these things, and I think it's really interesting, but I feel like for once I'm arguing the more solid ground :)
  • imamazed 20 Mar 2013 11:05:17 5,902 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Does any of this matter?
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 11:09:22
    Fuck off.
  • roz123 20 Mar 2013 11:10:18 7,113 posts
    Seen 2 weeks ago
    Registered 6 years ago
    Italian Spaghetti is my favourite.
  • imamazed 20 Mar 2013 11:11:57 5,902 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    @kalel Fair
  • khaz 20 Mar 2013 11:12:10 2,826 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    kalel wrote:
    Yes, but some sub-genres are more obviously part of the larger genre than others. Spaghetti Westerns are very obviously westerns. You wouldn't even know they weren't filmed in the actual West of America if you weren't informed. Show the first scene of Once Upon a Time in the West to pretty much anyone who doesn't really know much about Westerns, and they'd say it was a Western.

    Equally the uninformed would be (imo) unlikely to watch the first scene of Yojimbo and define it as one.

    I don't really think I'm being all that pedantic here. I can see the argument for the potential definitions of these things, and I think it's really interesting, but I feel like for once I'm arguing the more solid ground :)
    Haha, not on the solid side often? :D

    But we aren't uninitiated in this thread. So I think we can disregard that particular area. If I had to start someone off on Westerns I would get them to watch Once Upon a Time in the West. It's my favourite western and one of the greatest films ever to boot.
  • Gartt 20 Mar 2013 11:14:16 1,848 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    I think you got it there, the uninformed or casual viewer, but I think it's a great genre to explore because every country will have their own interpretation of it. It's a very deep genre.
  • Deleted user 20 March 2013 11:17:40
    But the whole point of generic descriptions is that they are for the uninformed surely?

    These incredibly broad and general descriptions of films are irrelevant to those of us who actually know what they're about. The whole reason we have terms like "Western" is to give the uninformed some sense of what the films is broadly about, and to that end, "the west" does seem utterly fundamental here.
  • Page

    of 2844 First / Last

Log in or register to reply