Tropical Fish Page 3

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  • binky Moderator 11 Dec 2012 13:50:45 9,447 posts
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    As a thought, if I went TALLER rather than longer, would that help or do the little guys prefer doing lengths? :)
  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 13:52:50 86,392 posts
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    Different fish have different needs. I think some do prefer depth. I keep fancy goldfish which are happier in shallow, narrow longer tanks.
  • Deleted user 11 December 2012 14:10:18
    I just discovered an awesome tool for my fish tank. It's basically a tube with what looks like a vacuum nozzle on the end. You insert the nozzle into the water and shake it up and down a bit thus creating water pressure which then syphons water our of the tank for you. The nozzle is meant to suck up all the shit from your gravel. The gravel gets sucked into the first part of the nozzle but there's not enough pressure to suck them all the way up the pipe so the lighter shit gets separated out.

    It's amazing. Once it gets into full flow it can half empty the tank in about 2 minutes.

    While this thread is live, my guppys have started rubbing their bellys on the gravel. A quick google suggests this is something called flashing and that they might have stinging gills from too much ammonia in the tank. I replaced about 1/3 of the tank in the hope that this would clear it up but they're still doing it and one died this week. :\
  • LeoliansBro 11 Dec 2012 14:13:29 43,229 posts
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    Worse then mowgli!

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Deleted user 11 December 2012 14:15:58
    I prefer to model myself on the internet sensation that is BlizeH, actually.

    OK. What I should have said was: can anyone recommend me products that will tell me how much ammonia is in my tank and get rid of it? Stuff that works.
  • RyanDS 11 Dec 2012 14:16:32 9,062 posts
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    HairyArse wrote:
    I just discovered an awesome tool for my fish tank. It's basically a tube with what looks like a vacuum nozzle on the end. You insert the nozzle into the water and shake it up and down a bit thus creating water pressure which then syphons water our of the tank for you. The nozzle is meant to suck up all the shit from your gravel. The gravel gets sucked into the first part of the nozzle but there's not enough pressure to suck them all the way up the pipe so the lighter shit gets separated out.

    It's amazing. Once it gets into full flow it can half empty the tank in about 2 minutes.

    While this thread is live, my guppys have started rubbing their bellys on the gravel. A quick google suggests this is something called flashing and that they might have stinging gills from too much ammonia in the tank. I replaced about 1/3 of the tank in the hope that this would clear it up but they're still doing it and one died this week. :\
    Just be careful with those if you haven't used one before.

    Basically loads of shit builds up under the sand / gravel and using one of those can disturb the gravel hugely and release the months / years of built up crap. So if you do use one for the first time I recomend doing a large water change just to stop the fish taking a hit from the sudden change in water chemicals.

    As regards the guppies, how often do you do a water change, and do you test for Nitrites / Nitrates / Ammonia? And when you do water changes do you dechlorinate?
  • RyanDS 11 Dec 2012 14:18:15 9,062 posts
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    HairyArse wrote:
    I prefer to model myself on the internet sensation that is BlizeH, actually.

    OK. What I should have said was: can anyone recommend me products that will tell me how much ammonia is in my tank and get rid of it? Stuff that works.
    Nothing works to get rid of ammonia. There are chemicals such as ammo-lock but to be honest it is much better just to do regular, small water changes.

    There are loads of different test kits, I use these personally:
    http://www.google.co.uk/products/catalog?q=aquarium+test+kits&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=234989396181681222&sa=X&ei=mEDHUK24BIHD0QXd5oGgBg&ved=0CEwQ8wIwAQ
  • Deleted user 11 December 2012 14:18:22
    I change about 10% of the water every month or so. Though I did replace a good 30% last week after the hoovering. Have never tested for anything. I only have a pleccy, some guppys and some neon tetras.
  • RyanDS 11 Dec 2012 14:23:38 9,062 posts
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    That is rather a low amount to be honest. Most people reccomend weekly 10-20% water changes, which may be why you are having issues.

    Saying that I used to be pretty crap at keeping my schedules as well and those sort of recomendations are always very conservative.

    From a guess I would say you have nitrate build up. Just do regular, small water changes and it should be fine. (Regular and small is better than irregular and large as fish develop "old tank syndrome" where they get used to the nitrates and the shock of fresh water can kill or sicken them.0
  • ronuds 11 Dec 2012 15:28:27 21,788 posts
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    How long has the tank been set up?

    Edit: Oh yeah, the rubbing could also be ick. Look to see if they have tiny white spots all over their bodies.

    Edited by ronuds at 15:30:43 11-12-2012
  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 15:28:53 86,392 posts
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    I was told once in a while (6 months to a year) you should do a real proper tank clean - take everything out, rinse all your gravel (in tank water), give your tank a good clean (with tank cleaner, not washing up liquid or anything) and then refill with conditioned water and some stress zyme or whatever.

    Again, this might be more because I have godlies which are filthy fuckers, but still, there's stuff that builds up in your tank that filters and water changes won't get rid of.
  • ronuds 11 Dec 2012 15:33:44 21,788 posts
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    You wouldn't want to do that unless you have all older, more established fish that could survive your tank going through a new "cycle".

    There's good stuff in that established water, in your gravel and filter that you don't want to get rid of.
  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 15:36:04 86,392 posts
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    Well, the gravel and filter and all the other tank stuff still has the good bacteria in it, that doesn't get cleaned (just rinsed a bit with tank water). So it's not a 100% new cycle.
  • ronuds 11 Dec 2012 15:51:13 21,788 posts
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    I've got one of these bad boys to clean the gravel:


    You just hook one end to the sink, lead the other end outside and it does the work for you! :D

    I've got a big-ish tank, so taking out all of the gravel is only going to happen if I'm replacing it. The vauum sucks all the crap out of it, though.

    Some of my fish I've had for over 10 years. :) I had a mass genocide once... when I moved and cleaned everything thoroughly. That was a pisser - lost fish I had for years!
  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 16:06:46 86,392 posts
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    Yeah I think if you have a pretty big tank then you probably don't want to be doing total cleans, but also if you have a big tank you'll have a better filter and 10% water changes are a lot more water etc etc.

    Smaller tanks and in particular smaller filters are less efficient and eventually you probably need to do something a bit more drastic.

    I'm planning a mega tank next year. I want at least 70 gallons or so, and might even see if I can manage 100.
  • ronuds 11 Dec 2012 16:18:36 21,788 posts
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    Mega tanks are awesome, but they are a lot of effing work! Make sure you don't need that space in the house for anything else, too - like, for for-e-ver. You'll never get that spot back! Also, make sure the floor you put it on can support about 1000 pounds of weight. :D

    I'd definitely recommend one of those gravel vacuums, if you don't already have one. That's saved me so many hours of carting buckets all over the place.
  • Popzeus 11 Dec 2012 16:21:32 8,272 posts
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    EDIT: this is @binky

    Yeah, that looks pretty tiny TBH. OK for a few neons or white clouds, or one fighting fish, but not much else.

    To answer your question you're always better going longer or wider rather than deeper, as you want the biggest surface area you can get.

    More surface area = more oxygen in the water = more fish can be supported.

    Edited by Popzeus at 16:24:12 11-12-2012

    Currently playing: Standing In A Car Park Simulator 2013

  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 16:26:56 86,392 posts
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    ronuds wrote:
    Mega tanks are awesome, but they are a lot of effing work! Make sure you don't need that space in the house for anything else, too - like, for for-e-ver. You'll never get that spot back! Also, make sure the floor you put it on can support about 1000 pounds of weight. :D

    I'd definitely recommend one of those gravel vacuums, if you don't already have one. That's saved me so many hours of carting buckets all over the place.
    No I use a gravel vacuum. I thought everyone did. How else do you change water?

    Why are mega tanks so much work? I thought part of the whole point was the more water you had, the more of a "natural ecosystem" you create and the less work they actually are. Unless you just mean basic gravel cleaning and such being more of a ball-ache.
  • RyanDS 11 Dec 2012 16:32:21 9,062 posts
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    Wish I could get a big tank. Unfortunately due to the IVF costs I've just sold off all my fish, coral and live rock. Sitting at home with an empty marine setup that I built up myself (eg the drilling, sumping etc) and trying to work up the energy to put it all on ebay.

    Unless anyone here near sutton fancies picking up a complete marine setup?
  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 16:35:39 86,392 posts
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    I don't think I could ever have the patience for a marine tank. That really is work,
  • Popzeus 11 Dec 2012 16:38:07 8,272 posts
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    (doublepost madness)

    Edited by Popzeus at 16:38:41 11-12-2012

    Currently playing: Standing In A Car Park Simulator 2013

  • Popzeus 11 Dec 2012 16:38:23 8,272 posts
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    Yeah, I'd love a marine setup but think I'd have to be retired to have enough time to devote to one.

    I'm a lazy fishkeeper really, just have a tank with the hardiest species of tropical fish I can find and an overpowered filter so it needs cleaning out as rarely as possible.

    Currently playing: Standing In A Car Park Simulator 2013

  • RyanDS 11 Dec 2012 16:40:52 9,062 posts
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    kalel wrote:
    I don't think I could ever have the patience for a marine tank. That really is work,
    I'd only do a mega tank if I ever did Marine again.

    The workload is insane, but so much easier to manage when the volume increases. Water is more stable, you can get better stock to control critters etc.

    Saying that it did look amazing and was a real talking point. Having a proper coral reef crawling with starfish, crabs etc is ALMOST worth the minimum 20 minutes every single day.
  • RyanDS 11 Dec 2012 16:44:08 9,062 posts
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    Also so many hidden costs. Just water is 10 a week, (No tap water, has to be RO water, then that RO water has to be mixed with salt, then leave the salt mixing for 2 days etc etc. And then you have to add in so many chemicals such a Calcium, Kh etc. Then you get some fucking Aptasia and have to demolish the fucking reef to kill one anenome before they breed and destroy the tank...

    Actually, no, they aren't worth it thinking back!
  • Popzeus 11 Dec 2012 16:44:11 8,272 posts
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    My uncle has a marine tank, it looks amazing but the point at which I realised I couldn't be arsed was when he was explaining how he has to get special water delivered to put in it.

    Currently playing: Standing In A Car Park Simulator 2013

  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 16:47:18 86,392 posts
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    Again, I can't even begin to contemplate the monumental ball-ache that is keeping a marine tank. I don't know how people do it to be honest. I guy at work was talking about how he has a tank guy that comes in once a week like a cleaning lady just to sort his tank. Only way I could manage it, but that's a real expense.
  • ronuds 11 Dec 2012 16:47:34 21,788 posts
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    @kalel - Sorry, I meant a vacuum that connects to your sink.

    But, yeah, I just meant that general maintenance is a pain.
  • kalel 11 Dec 2012 16:52:23 86,392 posts
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    ronuds wrote:
    @kalel - Sorry, I meant a vacuum that connects to your sink.

    But, yeah, I just meant that general maintenance is a pain.
    Oooooh. Right yeah. No. I shleip buckets :)

    Would get something else to do the mega tank when I eventually get that though.

    Edited by kalel at 16:52:39 11-12-2012
  • Popzeus 11 Dec 2012 16:54:08 8,272 posts
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    Good to see so many other regs are fish people, BTW.

    Currently playing: Standing In A Car Park Simulator 2013

  • ronuds 11 Dec 2012 17:05:20 21,788 posts
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    Fish are misunderstood!

    I always chime in with my advice to people in local shops. God knows that people working there don't know shit 90% of the time. They probably think I'm a freak, though. :p
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