End of the English language as we know it Page 3

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  • Deckard1 28 Aug 2013 13:05:20 25,414 posts
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    I've heard of selfie because of user HairyArse and twerking I heard of a few days ago thanks to Miley Cyrus and her coke fueled fanny dancing being all over the internet the past few days.

    Called it

  • Megapocalypse 28 Aug 2013 13:09:59 5,228 posts
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    I guess I've heard of cuntphone because I have one. I don't take twatographs though.
  • FromTheHalfWayLine 28 Aug 2013 13:14:13 45 posts
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    @RyanDS It's what flat-assed white chicks do, to make them feel more black :)
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 13:22:44 41,980 posts
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    Click and collect is idiomatic; it's a set expression with a specific context. One does not "normally" say "press and collect" nor "click and pick up". The connected speech is aided by the conjunction "and" being reduced and that the "co" in collect is unstressed and a schwa. The alliteration helps its flow too.

    Now as someone pointed out, it tends to be used in written form, given it comes from the net. But that matters not.
  • Alastair 28 Aug 2013 13:25:12 14,953 posts
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    Isn't Click and Collect just a crappy expression on the Tesco and/or Argos websites? Made popular due to it's alliterative property. Is it really in such common usage?

    Not as nice as I used to be

  • Mola_Ram 28 Aug 2013 13:27:34 6,246 posts
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    Being entered into the Oxford dictionary would seem to suggest so.
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 13:29:12 41,980 posts
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    The fact that it has made it into the OED is all you need to know about its usage. They don't chuck anything in. The OED simply describes the language and how it is used.
  • Deckard1 28 Aug 2013 13:29:52 25,414 posts
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    I imagine middle class woman say it when they're chatting about shit to other middle class woman while dropping little Rudiger off at school.

    Called it

  • neems 28 Aug 2013 13:31:27 1,081 posts
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    I think you can have things in the OED that aren't actually words - surely nobody would suggest that TL;DR is a word. Presumably if you look it up it will tell you that it's a shit acronym.

    They still won't allow it on Countdown. I do however look forward to Deckard's debut in Dictionary Corner.
  • Mola_Ram 28 Aug 2013 13:34:05 6,246 posts
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    Obviously it's a bit of a weird one, but tl;dr is used like an adjective.
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 13:36:02 41,980 posts
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    Deckard1 wrote:
    I imagine middle class woman say it when they're chatting about shit to other middle class woman while dropping little Rudiger off at school.
    Of course, and they probably criticise language we use. It is all good. Allows us to be different.
  • Destria 28 Aug 2013 14:33:58 2,815 posts
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    It's worth noting that it's NOT the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) that this has been entered in. It's actually the Oxford Dictionaries Online (ODO).

    I'm not actually sure what the difference is, as the description on their website seems to imply that the ODO is more relevant to everyday English speakers, and the OED is more of a historical record.

    Edit: Though I imagine that there's more preventing "TL;DR" being used on Countdown than the dictionaryness of it. "Punctuation mark please Rachel".

    Edited by Destria at 14:35:56 28-08-2013

    Edited by Destria at 14:36:14 28-08-2013
  • mrpon 28 Aug 2013 14:37:31 27,646 posts
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    Two from the top and one in the bottom please Rachel.

    Give yourself 5 or gig, you're worth it.

  • LeoliansBro 28 Aug 2013 14:46:06 41,866 posts
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    I love how inclusion in a single dictionary is treated like some affirmative stamp of quality for a word. A dictionary tracks language usage (or risks becoming obsolete), it does not vet incoming words for intrinsic worth.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • LeoliansBro 28 Aug 2013 14:46:48 41,866 posts
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    Also, I'd be more interested in finding out which words had been dropped.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Deleted user 28 August 2013 14:48:28
    LeoliansBro wrote:
    Also, I'd be more interested in finding out which words had been dropped.
    "and"
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 15:23:03 41,980 posts
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    LeoliansBro wrote:
    I love how inclusion in a single dictionary is treated like some affirmative stamp of quality for a word. A dictionary tracks language usage (or risks becoming obsolete), it does not vet incoming words for intrinsic worth.
    And unless you are some elitist, worth = usage. Just cause you don't personally use it, doesn't mean it isn't of value.

    I'd say the words listed in the OP have decent surrender value. My students, if they don't already know them, would be very interested to. I'll bring them up in class tomorrow and see if they value them.
  • Deleted user 28 August 2013 15:34:01
    I dont know what you call if but words that sound like what they mean. For instance: gloopy, snap or whisper.

    Well 'twerking' is not one of those words.

    Thank you for your time.
  • Deckard1 28 Aug 2013 15:34:09 25,414 posts
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    I'd be interested to see what they think

    Called it

  • Ashleyfiddes 28 Aug 2013 15:35:43 980 posts
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    @FWB I can safely say that I have happily lived my life without knowing what twerking was and have never felt the need to say selfie, so I can say with confidence that they are not required to understand english
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 15:36:05 41,980 posts
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    Onomatopoeia.
  • Load_2.0 28 Aug 2013 15:37:08 18,201 posts
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    He is having a seizure.
  • Ashleyfiddes 28 Aug 2013 15:38:56 980 posts
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    Oink oink????

    oxymoron (without the oxy)
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 15:40:13 41,980 posts
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    Ashleyfiddes wrote:
    @FWB I can safely say that I have happily lived my life without knowing what twerking was and have never felt the need to say selfie, so I can say with confidence that they are not required to understand english
    Understand English? What do you mean by that?
    Depends who you are talking to and what you are talking about. You and your group that you aocialise may use a large amount of lexis others view as unimportant/useless and vice versa.
  • Ashleyfiddes 28 Aug 2013 15:45:38 980 posts
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    @FWB I tend to speak very plain English (i am boring like that) and apart from the odd lol at the end of sentences (which I have worked hard to remove) I don't really have a specific lexis (as you do eloquently put it). I would quite happily admit that no one should learn English from me though, I have too many bad habits.
  • Zomoniac 28 Aug 2013 15:48:30 7,402 posts
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    neems wrote:
    I think you can have things in the OED that aren't actually words - surely nobody would suggest that TL;DR is a word. Presumably if you look it up it will tell you that it's a shit acronym.
    It's not an acronym. Except it probably is now because I suspect the definition of acronym has changed because everybody used it to mean something it didn't.
  • Deleted user 28 August 2013 15:49:55
    Technology has fundamentally changed the way we live and interact with each other. I think it's safe to say that new words and phrases will inevitably work their way into our general vocabulary, spearheaded by the younger generation who are quicker to adapt to change, and more comfortable with the notion of having such words and phrases in everyday useage (rather than old bastards like me who are scared of anything new). I don't see it being anything different to the way language has evolved in the past.
  • graysonavich 28 Aug 2013 15:52:26 6,802 posts
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    It's interesting, since owning a Lexus, it's amazing the number of Lexi you see around
  • Zomoniac 28 Aug 2013 15:55:08 7,402 posts
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    graysonavich wrote:
    It's interesting, since owning a Lexus, it's amazing the number of Lexi you see around
    If you have a house and then another house then surely you should have two hice?
  • Ashleyfiddes 28 Aug 2013 15:55:58 980 posts
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    Zomoniac wrote:
    graysonavich wrote:
    It's interesting, since owning a Lexus, it's amazing the number of Lexi you see around
    If you have a house and then another house then surely you should have two hice?
    :)
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