End of the English language as we know it Page 5

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  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 17:00:51 50,714 posts
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    Going to use that in a lesson. :) Ta.
  • Deleted user 28 August 2013 17:02:22
    Oh are you a teacher?
  • President_Weasel 28 Aug 2013 17:03:43 11,394 posts
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    FWB wrote:
    Here's another one for you... research shows that the present perfect is fading with the younger British generations, in favour for American usage of the past simple. :)
    Fuck the sole use of the past simple in preference to having the option of both. Fuck it right in the ear.
  • FWB 28 Aug 2013 17:07:26 50,714 posts
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    I like the present perfect, but then I would. But it's a major pain in the arse for learners, particularly those whose first language has no perfect aspect. If they aren't taking an IELTS, FCE et al then they can forget about it for most of the time.

    Edited by FWB at 17:09:28 28-08-2013
  • President_Weasel 28 Aug 2013 18:00:42 11,394 posts
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    You can express what you need to uing the past simple, sure, although there are nuances that you might lose. However it feels far more natural to me to use a mixture of the two, as Roy Batty does in the Tears in Rain soliloquy.
  • FartPipe 28 Aug 2013 18:08:57 5,167 posts
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    Alastair wrote:
    Do they also remove expressions that were added that have since fallen out of favour?
    I'm sure def was added back in the 80s - do people still say def?
    I sometimes use deffo if it's the same meaning.
  • MrSensible 28 Aug 2013 18:09:06 26,227 posts
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    I have absolutely no idea what is going on in here now...

    I would feel stupid, but I'm so baffled that I'm not sure how to feel any more.
  • Razz 3 Nov 2013 22:32:52 62,707 posts
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    Quick grammar question:

    "A qualified and versatile administrator who is experienced at providing support to..."

    Should that be at or in?
    Also should I get rid of the who is and just a comma instead?

    Edited by Razz at 22:33:28 03-11-2013
  • FWB 3 Nov 2013 22:33:48 50,714 posts
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    I'd use "at" with the adjective and "in" with the noun.

    You can remove the "who is". It'd be a reduced relative clause. Reads better.

    Edited by FWB at 22:35:19 03-11-2013
  • Razz 3 Nov 2013 23:42:28 62,707 posts
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    @FWB Thank you
  • mal 4 Nov 2013 02:03:50 25,395 posts
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    You could also switch the verb 'experienced' with the noun form 'with experience' and then it's definitely 'in', as in: A qualified and versatile administrator with experience in providing support to...
  • Telepathic.Geometry 4 Nov 2013 04:23:13 12,181 posts
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    mal wrote: You could also switch the verb 'experienced' with the noun form 'with experience' and then it's definitely 'in', as in: A qualified and versatile administrator with experience in providing support to...
    Classic native-speaker ninja dodge there mal. :D
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