Where can I get good quality horse meat? Page 4

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  • Psychotext 16 Jan 2013 15:26:18 55,030 posts
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    This is on hotukdeals at the mo: http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/horse-fillet-steaks-4-69-kezie-foods-1446542
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:30:08
    How do you explain them using horses to make glue from in the old days then?
  • MetalDog 16 Jan 2013 15:31:20 23,920 posts
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    Deckard1 wrote:
    kalel wrote:
    No, again, I'm saying the nature of their use to us defines our relationship with them. Not the other way round.
    Well yeah, I've haven't denied that, what I'm saying is we built a relationship with horses because we could ride them. They became companions that man used to take to war with them. A bond has been built up over thousands of years between the two species because of this relationship, which is why a lot of people would feel weird eating them. Regardless of whether or not they were easier to farm for food I believe this would have happened.
    The Mongol eat horse and their relationship with the horse is still a close one - much more so than most modern Brits.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • elstoof 16 Jan 2013 15:32:10 8,302 posts
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    Maybe horse meat could go by a different name like it does in the leather industry. All skins are named after the animal it came from, calfskin, buckskin etc, apart from horse which is called cordovan. Anyone got a cool name we could jazz horse meat up with?
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:33:00
    One theory as to why we started to ride horses is so we could more easily catch and kill other horses. The bond isn't so strong that we wouldn't start mass-farming horses should an epidemic sweep through the cow population. Pretty sure during the BSE crisis horsemeat sales soared.

    I bet Deckard cried at the film War Horse.
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:37:19
    The question I suppose is whether in the event of easily farmable and super tasty horses becoming available, could the general populace be persuaded to eat them?

    I reckon so. Perhaps I'm just a cold-hearted bastard but I don't think it would take much persuasion at all tbh.
  • Syrette 16 Jan 2013 15:39:48 44,208 posts
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    MetalDog wrote:
    Deckard1 wrote:
    kalel wrote:
    No, again, I'm saying the nature of their use to us defines our relationship with them. Not the other way round.
    Well yeah, I've haven't denied that, what I'm saying is we built a relationship with horses because we could ride them. They became companions that man used to take to war with them. A bond has been built up over thousands of years between the two species because of this relationship, which is why a lot of people would feel weird eating them. Regardless of whether or not they were easier to farm for food I believe this would have happened.
    The Mongol eat horse and their relationship with the horse is still a close one - much more so than most modern Brits.
    They're mongs

  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:40:03
    I just again think had they been easy to farm and really tasty, that history might have been quite different. Is that really so unlikely?
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:41:22
    A lot of people on FB were making comments along the lines of "wondered why Tesco burgers were so tasty". I don't think it would take much at all.
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:44:49
    It's not like their use these days goes much beyond brutally forcing them extremely dangerous tracks at high speed for our entertainment anyway.

    I think you're somewhat romanticising this relationship tbh deck.
  • Mr-Brett 16 Jan 2013 15:45:52 12,886 posts
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    I don't buy the special bond thing. What mode of transport my great-great-grandfather may have used doesn't affect my choice of food.

    Level 37 Social Justice Warrior

  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:46:22
    Deckard1 wrote:
    there's a lot more to it then "they're a bit awkward to eat."
    I don't think there is, really. There is slightly more to it, but it's more along the lines of "they're useful in other areas and don't produce as much meat as cows" rather than "we have a magical special bond with the lovely beasts". Cows are good for milk and beef and that's really about it, so they're farmed specifically for food en-mass.
  • nickthegun 16 Jan 2013 15:46:34 61,270 posts
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    To be honest, because horses are quite lean its not really appealling to the british pallet. We like meat nice and fatty.

    That and the fact we give them names and personalities.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • RyanDS 16 Jan 2013 15:49:32 9,826 posts
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    Deckard1 wrote:
    kalel wrote:
    No, again, I'm saying the nature of their use to us defines our relationship with them. Not the other way round.
    Well yeah, I've haven't denied that, what I'm saying is we built a relationship with horses because we could ride them. They became companions that man used to take to war with them. A bond has been built up over thousands of years between the two species because of this relationship, which is why a lot of people would feel weird eating them. Regardless of whether or not they were easier to farm for food I believe this would have happened.
    In that case why do the cultures that are much more intertwined with horses have no issues with eating them? Such as the Mongols (who also drink the milk) and other steppe tribes.

    The weirdness of eating them I'd say is nothing to do with 1000s of years of bond, but more to do with the move to urbanisation where we have stopped living next door to animals and started seeing them as pets, rather than the previous 1000s of years when they were "whatever we can get out of them to make our lives less shit."

    Edit: Damn you MetalDog and my slow posting!!!!

    Edited by RyanDS at 15:50:38 16-01-2013
  • MetalDog 16 Jan 2013 15:50:51 23,920 posts
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    But they /are/ used as a food animal in plenty of places despite the people having the same working/familiar relationship with the beasts so that's obviously not the reason they're not eaten here.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:52:41
    By all accounts pigs and sheep actually make really good pets, but they make better roasted dinners, so that was the role we chose for them.
  • nickthegun 16 Jan 2013 15:53:46 61,270 posts
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    As i say, same as the reason why fanta tastes different from country to country, horse just isnt a meat that the british like.

    its like all of the idiots trying to get us to eat emu and aligator. Yeah, its alright but we are quite happy with the four main food animals, so it will never be more than a fad.

    Horse tastes a bit like beef but a bit sharper, so people are just going to eat beef.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:55:42
    kalel wrote:
    The question I suppose is whether in the event of easily farmable and super tasty horses becoming available, could the general populace be persuaded to eat them?

    I reckon so. Perhaps I'm just a cold-hearted bastard but I don't think it would take much persuasion at all tbh.
    I think it would simply be a case of putting the meat up for sale. People would buy it, no problem. The general vibe I've been getting today is that people are amused, not digusted
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:56:41
    nickthegun wrote:
    As i say, same as the reason why fanta tastes different from country to country, horse just isnt a meat that the british like.

    its like all of the idiots trying to get us to eat emu and aligator. Yeah, its alright but we are quite happy with the four main food animals, so it will never be more than a fad.

    Horse tastes a bit like beef but a bit sharper, so people are just going to eat beef.
    But even in counties where they do eat horse like France, beef is more readily available and popular, because it's so much easier to farm, which was what my earlier point was.
  • nickthegun 16 Jan 2013 15:56:49 61,270 posts
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    kalel wrote:
    By all accounts pigs and sheep actually make really good pets, but they make better roasted dinners, so that was the role we chose for them.
    Long and interminable anecdote: When he was a boy, my dad adopted the runt lamb of the litter because its mum wasnt feeding it. After a year or so, the sheep followed him around like a dog and it was actually very well trained. It would stay, sit, come and all that caper.

    One day my uncle was a head down to send to the slaughterhouse, so he just called my dads sheep, who obligingly waddled over and jumped into the truck.

    'Wheres my sheep?'
    'in a butchers shop'

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • nickthegun 16 Jan 2013 15:57:30 61,270 posts
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    kalel wrote:
    nickthegun wrote:
    As i say, same as the reason why fanta tastes different from country to country, horse just isnt a meat that the british like.

    its like all of the idiots trying to get us to eat emu and aligator. Yeah, its alright but we are quite happy with the four main food animals, so it will never be more than a fad.

    Horse tastes a bit like beef but a bit sharper, so people are just going to eat beef.
    But even in counties where they do eat horse like France, beef is more readily available and popular, because it's so much easier to farm, which was what my earlier point was.
    But their taste is markedly different, which is my point. Hence them eating frogs, snails and probably puppydog tails.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:58:34
    OK, we are making different points :)
  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 15:58:51
    A quick google suggests that horsemeat was fairly common in the UK right up until WW2.
  • disusedgenius 16 Jan 2013 16:00:21 5,609 posts
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    Have you got a Wikipedia link to substantiate that?
  • MetalDog 16 Jan 2013 16:00:45 23,920 posts
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    Sorry Ryan =D

    I reckon in this country the Victorian Age was the real turning point for horses and probably animals in general. There was a big move to treat them less like shit in that period, so they would have bigged up the romantic and anthropomorphic elements in their effort to stop people from starving and beating the shit out of cab horses in the street.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • Deleted user 16 January 2013 16:00:48
    Bean pies and lentil rissoles provided protein to eke out our meagre meat ration, and the horse-meat shop, which previously had sold its products only for dogs, now bore a notice on some of its joints occasionally, 'Fit for Human Consumption'. This horse-meat was not rationed, but it did have to be queued for and sure enough eventually it appeared on our table. It had to be cooked for a long time and even then it was still tough. Nevertheless, it did not get thrown out.
  • Psychotext 16 Jan 2013 16:02:13 55,030 posts
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    nickthegun wrote:
    'Wheres my sheep?'
    'in a butchers shop'
    I suspect I might have hurt him... a lot.
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