Building extension costs

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  • Blakester 5 Oct 2011 09:52:03 3,635 posts
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    I was going to title this thread "Extension costs" but knew I'd been opening myself up to a glut of penis enhancement gags (there's still going to be a few).

    Onto the matter at hand, we're looking to build a single story extension to our house and was looking for some cost guidelines from anyone who has had something similar built in the last couple of years.

    It'll be a pretty basic single-story extension on the back of the house.

    Any help much appreciated.

    When you can't see the angles on the wall you're in trouble.

  • Salaman 5 Oct 2011 09:56:47 19,242 posts
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    Blakester wrote:
    I'd been opening myself up to a penis

    What gags?
  • figgis 5 Oct 2011 10:04:45 7,376 posts
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    How big? It's roughly around £1200 per sqm to carcass/shell level.
  • richarddavies 5 Oct 2011 10:05:45 2,729 posts
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    You can afford house extentions? Can I borrow some money? By borrow I mean keep?
  • RunningMan 5 Oct 2011 10:19:44 2,435 posts
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    Is the extension big enough to require planning permission? I looked at getting an extension done a few years ago, just under the size required for planning permission. It sort of spiralled quickly to over 15k, so it didn't happen. Worth talking to an architect, as there are all sorts of hidden costs, the council costs (RSJ inspection) can mount up to a thousand quite quickly.
  • Nexus_6 5 Oct 2011 10:25:35 3,888 posts
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    Are you in England or Scotland?

    What size are you thinking of (for the extension, not the penis)

    What is going in to the new spaces? Kitchen? WC? Penis Dungeon?

    Is your garden sloped or flat?

    Do you live in a conservation area? (planning department can tell you this if you don't know)

    Is your house a listed building? (planning again, although you should know this one)

    Just a few questions to start with. PM if you want anything else for now.
  • Dougs 5 Oct 2011 10:26:35 68,374 posts
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    Nice, been thinking about much the same. In my case, I'm looking at extending above a small single story extension (my study, about 8ftX4ft) and re-model upstairs to give us a smaller bathroom and another bedroom. Much will depend on the footings of the existing extension I suspect....
  • Blakester 5 Oct 2011 10:34:25 3,635 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    Are you in England or Scotland?

    What size are you thinking of (for the extension, not the penis)

    What is going in to the new spaces? Kitchen? WC? Penis Dungeon?

    Is your garden sloped or flat?

    Do you live in a conservation area? (planning department can tell you this if you don't know)

    Is your house a listed building? (planning again, although you should know this one)

    Just a few questions to start with. PM if you want anything else for now.

    Great reply, thanks Nexus_6.

    1/ We're in England

    2/ Size - might have to get back to you on that one, but roughly 20ft x 15ft

    3/ It for a kitchen and downstairs WC

    4/ Garden has a very slight slope downwards

    5/ Not in a conservation area or a listen buiding

    When you can't see the angles on the wall you're in trouble.

  • kalel 5 Oct 2011 10:37:05 88,336 posts
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    My only advice is find out what the extra cost would be to extend beyond what youíre currently thinking.

    The people we bought our house off had a loft conversion done, but could have had a whole extra room put in at the same time for a tiny additional cost, but didnít because they didnít do their research properly (which all our neighbours subsequently did).

    Once youíre actually doing the extension and putting up scaffolding and all that, you might as well get as much done as you can while youíre there.
  • Blakester 5 Oct 2011 10:45:12 3,635 posts
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    kalel wrote:
    My only advice is find out what the extra cost would be to extend beyond what youíre currently thinking.

    The people we bought our house off had a loft conversion done, but could have had a whole extra room put in at the same time for a tiny additional cost, but didnít because they didnít do their research properly (which all our neighbours subsequently did).

    Once youíre actually doing the extension and putting up scaffolding and all that, you might as well get as much done as you can while youíre there.

    Sound advice.

    I think we're actually limited on what we can have done. So for example we can extend backwards but only a single story as there isn't enough clearance either side to be able to go up as well.

    We've been talking about doing this for years and now the bank has given us the green light, we'll definitely get as much done as possible.

    When you can't see the angles on the wall you're in trouble.

  • Nasty 5 Oct 2011 10:49:15 4,748 posts
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    Put aside at least £2000 for bacon rolls, milk, tea bags and 1/4 ton of sugar.
  • Nexus_6 5 Oct 2011 10:53:30 3,888 posts
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    Blakester wrote:

    1/ We're in England

    2/ Size - might have to get back to you on that one, but roughly 20ft x 15ft

    3/ It for a kitchen and downstairs WC

    4/ Garden has a very slight slope downwards

    5/ Not in a conservation area or a listen buiding


    1. Scottish architect here, so specifics I can't really help with sadly, but general building is all much of a muchness

    2. As Kalel says - consider carefully what you need and your space requirements for each area. Nothing worse than the sinking feeling you get when you walk in to a completed penis and think 'shit it's a bit on the small side eh?'

    3. If building regs are anything like Scotland now, you will be required to put in a much larger toilet on the ground floor than before. It should be accessible by ambulant disabled people at the least, and that comes with its own clearly set out dimensions. This will be bigger than your typical 'bog under the stair' but can be put to your advantage by doubling as a wet room/shower room etc.

    4. cool - shouldn't be a problem with complicated foundations then - dig a hole 600mm down and as wide as an excavator bucket and dump a load of concrete in with some wire mesh and off you go!

    5. excellent. This will make it much quicker - as someone mentioned there is probably a cut off for area of new building that doesn't need to go through planning, but you need to weigh this up with getting the space/length/girth you really want.

    6. although you may not need planning, you will require a building warrant and that requires detailed specifications of all building components - foundations (more detail than my bit above surprisingly), dwarf walls, timber inner leaf (?) brick/render outer, floor construction, pitched/sloped roof?, tiles, mechanical extract fans, fire doors, much more onerous requirements for good insulation and air tightness that previous years (even more so in scotland than england but not far off as I understand it

    etc etc.

    Talk to a builder that has been recommended by someone else. scope them out and if they seem dodgy dump them.

    If you are having trouble with this then get the phone book and speak to a local architect. They will probably be covered in a large page with RIBA crest (royal institute of british architects) dont go to one who advertises outwith this.

    You will need them anyway for the warrant stuff, and they shouldnt be too expensive if you are looking for a simple extension. anything more than 5% of total build cost and they are taking the piss.
  • henro_ben 5 Oct 2011 11:04:59 2,220 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:

    3. If building regs are anything like Scotland now, you will be required to put in a much larger toilet on the ground floor than before. It should be accessible by ambulant disabled people at the least, and that comes with its own clearly set out dimensions. This will be bigger than your typical 'bog under the stair' but can be put to your advantage by doubling as a wet room/shower room etc.

    Pretty sure that's for new builds only, not for an existing house.
  • Nexus_6 5 Oct 2011 11:07:36 3,888 posts
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    If it is like up here (caveat) then if the works include a new entrance level WC, in a house that doesn't already have one, it must conform to ambulant disabled sizes etc.

    so nyah nyah nyah :-D
  • henro_ben 5 Oct 2011 11:12:54 2,220 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    If it is like up here (caveat) then if the works include a new entrance level WC, in a house that doesn't already have one, it must conform to ambulant disabled sizes etc.

    so nyah nyah nyah :-D

    That seems rather unfair, but I'm prepared to concede the point!
  • Nexus_6 5 Oct 2011 11:16:37 3,888 posts
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    Yep, try explaining to a client that just wants a bog off the hall!

    It is actually a fairly enlightened element of the regs - planning for later life and inclusion for all. I don't have any particularly disabled friends, but imagine if you cant get their wheelchair in your toilet when they visit. Or if you have an accident or a child is born disabled. It just makes things more inclusive, but as you say, for 90% of us is a pain in the hole....

    Don't get me started on insulation values. Again, a great initiative but try explaining to your client they need 200mm insulation instead of the 0mm they used to do....
  • Blakester 5 Oct 2011 11:18:03 3,635 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    Blakester wrote:

    1/ We're in England

    2/ Size - might have to get back to you on that one, but roughly 20ft x 15ft

    3/ It for a kitchen and downstairs WC

    4/ Garden has a very slight slope downwards

    5/ Not in a conservation area or a listen buiding


    1. Scottish architect here, so specifics I can't really help with sadly, but general building is all much of a muchness

    2. As Kalel says - consider carefully what you need and your space requirements for each area. Nothing worse than the sinking feeling you get when you walk in to a completed penis and think 'shit it's a bit on the small side eh?'

    3. If building regs are anything like Scotland now, you will be required to put in a much larger toilet on the ground floor than before. It should be accessible by ambulant disabled people at the least, and that comes with its own clearly set out dimensions. This will be bigger than your typical 'bog under the stair' but can be put to your advantage by doubling as a wet room/shower room etc.

    4. cool - shouldn't be a problem with complicated foundations then - dig a hole 600mm down and as wide as an excavator bucket and dump a load of concrete in with some wire mesh and off you go!

    5. excellent. This will make it much quicker - as someone mentioned there is probably a cut off for area of new building that doesn't need to go through planning, but you need to weigh this up with getting the space/length/girth you really want.

    6. although you may not need planning, you will require a building warrant and that requires detailed specifications of all building components - foundations (more detail than my bit above surprisingly), dwarf walls, timber inner leaf (?) brick/render outer, floor construction, pitched/sloped roof?, tiles, mechanical extract fans, fire doors, much more onerous requirements for good insulation and air tightness that previous years (even more so in scotland than england but not far off as I understand it

    etc etc.

    Talk to a builder that has been recommended by someone else. scope them out and if they seem dodgy dump them.

    If you are having trouble with this then get the phone book and speak to a local architect. They will probably be covered in a large page with RIBA crest (royal institute of british architects) dont go to one who advertises outwith this.

    You will need them anyway for the warrant stuff, and they shouldnt be too expensive if you are looking for a simple extension. anything more than 5% of total build cost and they are taking the piss.

    The forum delivers yet again, thanks so much for the input.

    The WC point is a bit of a bummer because we won't have a huge amount of space to begin with but SWMBO is adamant we're having one.

    When you can't see the angles on the wall you're in trouble.

  • Dougs 5 Oct 2011 11:22:47 68,374 posts
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    How does providing access to a WC for disabled help when the rest of the house is totally unsuitable (my house for example is over 100 years old, narrow door frames and a step down to the kitchen). Unless you're going to retrofit, seems a bit pointless.

    Blakester - Assume you've seen this?
  • Nexus_6 5 Oct 2011 11:30:34 3,888 posts
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    It doesn't, is the basic answer. Full wheelchair access is something you would as you say require total refit for.

    Generally though a WC that can be accessed easily by someone using for example a walking frame or something is required in an accessible position such as off the entrance or through a wide door to another location (so you cant get round it by saying in a new build that its the ground floor bedroom's en-suite for example)
  • Blakester 5 Oct 2011 11:32:40 3,635 posts
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    Dougs wrote:
    How does providing access to a WC for disabled help when the rest of the house is totally unsuitable (my house for example is over 100 years old, narrow door frames and a step down to the kitchen). Unless you're going to retrofit, seems a bit pointless.

    Blakester - Assume you've seen this?

    Hah, never assume anything Dougs, I hadn't seen that.

    Duly bookmarked :-)

    When you can't see the angles on the wall you're in trouble.

  • singlestory 28 Nov 2011 11:30:00 1 posts
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    hai,
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  • nickthegun 28 Nov 2011 11:31:31 60,418 posts
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    But how can you do extensions in the UK if you are chinese?

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • tincanrocket 28 Nov 2011 11:34:26 3,020 posts
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    We just had a single story extension built on the back of our house, with a new kitchen, but no downstairs loo. The cost for us, with a pretty high spec finish was just shy of 40K, but we're in Oxford so probably paid a premium. We're very happy with it, though, and you can get some very decent loan deals at the moment (thanks, Tesco).
  • DaM 28 Nov 2011 11:52:59 13,326 posts
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    We had a disabled wheelchair chap visiting, but just gave him some beer in the garden. Had to put a ping pong ball in his pint to stop it freezing obviously, but he seemed happy enough.

    Coming to Watchdog soon - Single Story Extensions!

    Plus I know you've gone to all the trouble of getting a website and shit..but does "story" not have an "e" in it when it comes to buildings?
  • Deleted user 28 November 2011 11:56:28
    Cover the walls in elves and pixies and shit.
  • fergal_oc 28 Nov 2011 12:04:22 2,764 posts
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    Ooooo interesting thread alert.

    Bought my house which already had a single storey extension along the side of the house. Our plan was always to go above it and given that the previous owners had already drawn up plans and had planning permission approved it was a no brainer for us.

    I've just asked my builder from for a quote. I'm guessing that the 1st floor extension shouldn't be as expensive as a ground floor because there's no foundations to build, although the roof will need to come across to some extent.

    tincanrocket - how much of the £40k was for the foundations and out shell?
  • Dougs 21 Feb 2013 11:49:15 68,374 posts
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    Bump.

    Actually looking to do something similar to fergal, make a single storey into a double. But typically, my council hasn't retained the records of the existing extension, meaning I need to have a test dig done for building control to inspect the foundations. That'll be £500 please. Motherfuckers.
  • mrpon 21 Feb 2013 11:52:49 29,183 posts
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    I'm looking to get extension/conservatory/orangery added on and had two quotes so far, £16k and £28k.

    o_O

    Give yourself £5 or Ĺ gig, you're worth it.

  • Dougs 21 Feb 2013 12:08:36 68,374 posts
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    Crikey, there's a bit of a difference. In my experience, getting 3 quotes and going for the middle one is normally about right!

    I have no idea how much this might cost in total, was just hoping to not have to fork out £500 just to see if it's possible.
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