Amazing new camera tech Page 2

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  • mal 2 Jul 2011 21:10:42 22,841 posts
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    's like ray tracing but in the real world. Or a camera that doesn't use lenses, but uses software in their place.

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  • otto Moderator 2 Jul 2011 21:43:20 49,335 posts
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    /nods sagely

    I'm going with wizard

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  • Deleted user 2 July 2011 22:43:23
    otto wrote:
    Can anyone explain how this works optically? "Light fields" sound up there with midichlorians. Is it just a processor-heavy sharpening tech or is it properly deep depth of field? Sounds gimmicky tbh.

    I think the layman's version is that you have a grid of small lenses set up so that you're taking multiple focal lengths at the same time. You end up with an image that is tiny compared to the pixel count of the sensor but there's oodles of depth information in the file.

    If wizards did it the images could end up being larger than 1mp ;-P
  • otto Moderator 3 Jul 2011 15:17:05 49,335 posts
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    Sounds totally pointless - here's a thought: just focus properly in the first place! :D

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  • henro_ben 3 Jul 2011 15:22:52 2,244 posts
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    otto wrote:
    Sounds totally pointless - here's a thought: just focus properly in the first place! :D

    It'll probably end up being a gimmick added to mobile phones, but I wonder if there'll be a use for it in medical/scientific circles e.g. images from microscopes perhaps?
  • Tomo 3 Jul 2011 15:26:19 13,985 posts
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    Actually, that's a neat point henro: in a lot of the scientific microscopes for imaging cells and whatnot, depth is a pain in the arse, as you have to do multiple scans. That said, I can't imagine this tech is going to be useable on a macro/nanoscale... I imagine medical circles use cameras more than photography too.
  • Deleted user 20 October 2011 09:42:08
    Don't think there's any way this is getting added to mobile phones: WTF!?!

    I guess it's cheaper than I'd have thought, but still, WTF is with that design?
  • Dirtbox 20 Oct 2011 09:43:36 79,210 posts
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    The design speaks for itself if you look at the cutaway.

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  • Deleted user 20 October 2011 09:43:42
    Some more shots of the camera
  • henro_ben 20 Oct 2011 10:08:48 2,244 posts
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    Hmmm... looks a bit awkward to hold and like it'd be easy to drop.

    Still not convinced by the quality of the images, only the original focus point actually looks sharp, everything else looks slightly blury, becoming more so as you move away from the focus point.

    Vaguely fun clicking on the examples but I can't say I'm anxious to do it for every photo I take...
  • ram 20 Oct 2011 10:17:17 3,488 posts
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    It's a clever gimmick and I predict fail.

    The kind of people this camera looks like it is aimed at, just want a point and click with a flash so they can take it out on the razzle dazzle.
  • Psychotext 20 Oct 2011 10:59:57 55,032 posts
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    First gen tech though, hopefully someone will find a useful angle to sell it on and development can continue.
  • ram 20 Oct 2011 11:58:34 3,488 posts
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    Beyond the fact it's clever technology, I can't see any real-world advantages to it. Apart from correcting a focusing mistake.

    I am more than willing to eat my hat though if it takes off.

  • Psychotext 20 Oct 2011 12:01:42 55,032 posts
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    It should mean that CSI can do their image forensics without the techy amongst us throwing things at the screen. :D
  • Deleted user 20 October 2011 12:21:57
    If it takes a picture of all focal lengths every time, could it be used to improve 3D photography/cinematography? I'm picturing some kind of tech where the image can focus itself correctly based on where you're looking at any time. One of the issues with modern 3D films is that you have to be looking exactly where the director wants you to in order for it to fuly work - this could overcome that shortfall
  • monkeyspasm 21 Oct 2011 13:31:34 2,823 posts
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    It is fantastic tech, but also a missed opportunity IMO. Who's going to spend $500 on it?

    They're marketing it as a social media tool - how do you do that if you *have* to edit it before you can post it? Social media users want to snap an image and send it to Facebook, that's it. It's actually MORE hassle. Smartphones are where it's at there.

    Photographers might like it, but don't most photographers hate postprocessing, the skill's all in the shot? Does this not take that away? A photographer will surely want a DSLR.

    That's why I see it as a shame, and a missed opportunity. Licence the tech, and it'll be in every camera as an option. Light field mode or something. While I'd love to be able to adjust the focus on an image after the event, it'd be better if you still had the ability to focus using the camera itself. As it stands, you're losing convenience.

    It's really impressive how the CEO did his dissertation at Stanford on light fields and had the nous to set up the company and actually bring it to market, but if Olympus, Kodak, Sony etc were all involved, costs would plummet and it'd go mass-market.

    I love it, but don't know who'd actually buy it.

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