Help please, grammar Nazis. Page 3

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  • ronuds 7 Jan 2009 21:32:25 21,788 posts
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    Is the third for sheep?
  • RudeDog 7 Jan 2009 23:46:57 2,389 posts
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    My favourite "stupid English word" is Presents/presence (sound the same if not spelled the same).

    In what other language could you "be in the presence of some one and present them with presents?"
  • RudeDog 7 Jan 2009 23:47:21 2,389 posts
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    BTW Lutz - we should get JoeyTurtle into this thread ;-)
  • otto Moderator 7 Jan 2009 23:52:33 49,335 posts
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    Lutz wrote:
    Lutz is shocked at the quality of peoples English these days.

    Does that have an apostrophe in peoples?
    You're excelling yourself today Lutzie. :)

    It's "people's" - people is the plural of person and people's is the possessive. (The only exception is where "peoples" is used as the plural of "a people" meaning "a tribe" or "a race").

    say no to Eurogamer sigs

  • otto Moderator 7 Jan 2009 23:58:03 49,335 posts
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    RudeDog wrote:
    My favourite "stupid English word" is Presents/presence (sound the same if not spelled the same).

    In what other language could you "be in the presence of some one and present them with presents?"
    I like the different pronunciations of the letters 'ough':

    The tough doughty snake coughed on the banks of the lough though he hung from the rough bough as he ought.

    say no to Eurogamer sigs

  • Deleted user 8 January 2009 00:01:23
    o_O I thought you were English phAge, your written English is superb.
  • sirtacos 8 Jan 2009 00:11:03 7,378 posts
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    What? PhAge isn't English? He's one of the most articulate posters on EG!*

    What nationality are you phAge?

    *Then again, Pygmalion and all that.
  • Whizzo 8 Jan 2009 00:15:40 43,372 posts
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    He's Danish.

    Come to think of it, I think it's time we had some of our gold back that your ancestors extorted out of us some time ago. We need the money...

    This space left intentionally blank.

  • sirtacos 8 Jan 2009 00:23:25 7,378 posts
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    I'm Russian and French. Fuck you all.

    I love Denmark though. You make great bread.

    And girls. And films with Danish girls in them.

    In all seriousness though I find that the Dutch and the Danish are the coolest Europeans. The British don't count and neither do the Russians. The French suck.
  • Ajay 8 Jan 2009 00:55:36 2,412 posts
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    People's grammar is often poor.

    The various European peoples' languages are varied.
  • RudeDog 8 Jan 2009 12:41:32 2,389 posts
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    sirtacos wrote:
    I'm Russian and French. Fuck you all.

    I love Denmark though. You make great bread.

    And girls. And films with Danish girls in them.

    In all seriousness though I find that the Dutch and the Danish are the coolest Europeans. The British don't count and neither do the Russians. The French suck.

    The Austrians get my vote for coolest Europeans (Unless they have a little moustache or locked cellar)
  • Feanor 8 Jan 2009 18:12:03 14,185 posts
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    I like the Dutch, mainly for their ability to get away with tossing dead American tarts in the ocean.
  • phAge 8 Jan 2009 18:20:20 24,446 posts
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    Whizzo wrote:
    He's Danish.

    Come to think of it, I think it's time we had some of our gold back that your ancestors extorted out of us some time ago. We need the money...
    Soon as you give us our fleet back. Fuckers.

    EDIT: Also, seeing my nick written out so many times makes me realise just how ultra-fucking-fail that capital A is.

    /doublehanded Picard
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:35:04
    "Or shall I just present them as they are and tell Jim whom each present is from."

    Is it whom or who? I always get caught up with that.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:38:51
    I think it is whom, but it's quite formal and who is fine really.

    I think.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:39:28
    whom cares
  • Stickman 14 May 2009 11:40:44 29,664 posts
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    It's whom.

    All about subject and object pronouns innit.

    THIS SPACE FOR RENT

  • gohda 14 May 2009 11:41:11 6,642 posts
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    not who anyway.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:42:59
    Thanks, so is whom basically not used now?
  • WillyWanka 14 May 2009 11:45:35 802 posts
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    Here's another one:

    Should you always use "an" instead of "a" for words beginning with "h". It sounds fine if the "h" is silent, like "an honourable man", but it sounds really clumsy if it isn't, such as "an hotel". In the latter case it seems better if an "a" is used instead.

    :/
  • Stickman 14 May 2009 11:46:59 29,664 posts
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    It's all about how the word is spoken, not written.

    THIS SPACE FOR RENT

  • gohda 14 May 2009 11:47:14 6,642 posts
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    Use an if it's silent and there's a vowel clash. I think.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:47:37
    mowgli wrote:
    Thanks, so is whom basically not used now?

    It's used in formal and legal writing and such, but in most cases it's a little archaic.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:50:06
    Stickman wrote:
    It's all about how the word is spoken, not written.

    Yeah, it's about phonetics.

    If it's a hard vowel (starting with a consonant when spoken) then it behaves like a consonant, and vice versa.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 11:50:22
    Cool, I'll scrap it then.
  • WillyWanka 14 May 2009 11:50:39 802 posts
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    Stickman wrote:
    It's all about how the word is spoken, not written.

    That's what I thought. However, I recently heard someone on the BBC saying "an hero" or something similar, which made me wonder.
  • Angel_Treats 14 May 2009 12:04:08 11,072 posts
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    "An hotel" is one that always makes me wonder. I would write "a hotel" but I think I say "an hotel" and drop the H.
  • Deleted user 14 May 2009 12:04:51
    Angel_Treats wrote:
    "An hotel" is one that always makes me wonder. I would write "a hotel" but I think I say "an hotel" and drop the H.

    How French of you.
  • BanjoMan 14 May 2009 12:06:22 13,730 posts
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    I'm going to start emphasising the 'h' in 'wh' words.

    /whispers

    PSN: BanjoFett
    XBL: Banjo Fett

  • DavetheDave 14 May 2009 12:07:17 1,391 posts
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    Angel_Treats wrote:
    "An hotel" is one that always makes me wonder. I would write "a hotel" but I think I say "an hotel" and drop the H.

    Do you also spell Harrods with a capital A? :p

    /closest clip I could find
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