Help please, grammar Nazis. Page 13

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  • DodgyPast 20 Jun 2012 21:13:28 8,535 posts
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    FWB wrote:
    I didn't have a computer/console when I was abroad. Didn't need or miss it.
    Need a computer for work and TV :D

    But then I'm someone who loves chilling at home. On the first day of my weekend I rarely get further than the pool.
  • FWB 20 Jun 2012 21:15:41 45,580 posts
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    Fair enough. :) I was in bustling cities. Not really one for lazying by the pool. I need crowds. Places to go. People to meet.
  • mrharvest 21 Jun 2012 06:53:03 5,202 posts
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    I got a CELTA in 2008 but I haven't taught EFL as such. I did teach IB English at an international school this semester though. It's very different - the international school kids have very, very good spoken fluency but as a rule their written standard is appalling.

    It's getting in the way of their other subjects too. When I've covered I've noticed they can answer even complex questions if I just read the question aloud in different words but if they have to read it independently they'll struggle. If I was a full time IB teacher I'd plan my units to have a lot more grammar and reading comprehension.
  • DodgyPast 1 Jul 2012 16:09:22 8,535 posts
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    http://ciid.dk/education/portfolio/idp12/courses/data-visualisation/projects/silenc/

    They've been messing around with 'silent' letters, will have a look over it tomorrow.
  • Deleted user 1 September 2012 22:49:32
    A question on punctuation and colons. I'm currently writing up a mini-essay about the psychological concept of grit. The working title is:

    Is That You, John Wayne?: The Meaning of True Grit

    Should the question mark be there? Should the colon? Should the quote be in quotation marks in a title, and if so, should That You be lowercase? Or is it just fine as it is? I can't swap the colon for a hyphen as they're not allowed in titles for the essay format I'm using.

    I'll probably just change the title to something else, but it's puzzling me and I can't find any definitive answers out there on grammar and format guides.
  • Dirtbox 1 Sep 2012 23:04:25 79,186 posts
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    Yep, that works.

    +1 / Like / Tweet this post

  • Dirtbox 1 Sep 2012 23:05:39 79,186 posts
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    Although it's probably better to subtitle it visually than with punctuation.

    Is That You, John Wayne?
    The Meaning of True Grit

    You get the idea. Or stick a hyphen in there.

    Is That You, John Wayne? - The Meaning of True Grit

    Edited by Dirtbox at 23:06:35 01-09-2012

    +1 / Like / Tweet this post

  • Bremenacht 1 Sep 2012 23:09:32 19,660 posts
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    Dirtbox wrote:
    Is That You, John Wayne? - The Meaning of True Grit
    I know bugger-all, about punctuation, but that looks better to me.
  • Deleted user 1 September 2012 23:16:30
    Can't use a hyphen. I agree that's the best way grammatically and stylistically, but for the essay title I have to use colons. Dunno why, but they're particularly anal about following the exact formatting rules, so whacking in a hyphen could actually cost me a mark or two. Which is retarded to me, but there we go. It's mostly a question of punctuation prior to a colon. I think you're right, though, think it's mostly fine as it is.
  • Khanivor 1 Sep 2012 23:37:02 41,261 posts
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    Stick the question mark at the end.
  • Bremenacht 1 Sep 2012 23:38:30 19,660 posts
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    How about

    Is that You? John Wayne: The Meaning of True Grit

    Or does that break the rules?
  • mal 1 Sep 2012 23:52:21 22,830 posts
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    Stick the question in quotes maybe: "Is that you, John Wayne?" : The Meaning of True Grit

    But then you get into the argument about whether the question mark should be inside or outside the quotes. Since you're in America though, you can probably get away with inside fine.

    Edit: Also, it's a made-up quote at best, which is likely to piss off anyone who cares about punctuation in quotes.

    Edited by mal at 23:54:08 01-09-2012

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • drhcnip 1 Sep 2012 23:55:08 2,650 posts
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    traditionally, question marks should not be combined with other punctuation marks and some institutions dictate this in their formatting rules as well

    your safest bet from the suggested ones is dirt's one of separating the clauses via formatting

    Is That You, John Wayne?
    The Meaning of True Grit

    or possibly

    The Meaning of True Grit: Is That You, John Wayne?

    personally, i wouldn't advise combining the punctuation, especially if they're so finicky over hyphens
  • monkehhh 1 Sep 2012 23:58:05 3,505 posts
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    Indeed, I would count the question mark as the end of a sentence.
  • superdelphinus 2 Sep 2012 00:04:00 8,126 posts
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    Being pedantic, you shouldn't really use a hyphen there anyway. The two line option looks the nicest to me
  • mal 2 Sep 2012 00:34:14 22,830 posts
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    drhcnip wrote:
    The Meaning of True Grit: Is That You, John Wayne?
    Ooh, that's a good suggestion. That seems to meet all the arbitrary rules of english grammar while only slightly missing the requirements of the author - probably the best compromise you can come up with.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • localnotail 4 Oct 2012 19:26:49 23,093 posts
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    Thread uniform

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • localnotail 3 Sep 2013 23:50:51 23,093 posts
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    The new series of Fry's English Delight started this week. All about spelling. Very interesting stuff, especially the bits about how the spelling of English has changed through time and how some people think it should be overhauled.

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • DodgyPast 4 Sep 2013 04:32:56 8,535 posts
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    I never used to....

    I didn't use to...

    Or

    I used to not....

    Technically 1st and 2nd, but anyone else think the third is more common than the 2nd.
  • Deleted user 4 September 2013 05:19:07
    Don't think I've ever heard the third. Do you mean "I used not to?".
  • DodgyPast 4 Sep 2013 06:04:50 8,535 posts
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    both I guess
  • X201 4 Sep 2013 06:41:37 15,741 posts
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    All three sound OK to me. I suppose that tricky thing called context comes in to play.

    Although I prefer No. 3

    Edited by X201 at 06:43:01 04-09-2013
  • DodgyPast 4 Sep 2013 06:47:10 8,535 posts
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    Thinking more about it I know I use the second with the not stressed when I want to emphasise that it's something that has changed.
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