Skate It

Skate It

Skate It

Skate what?

You know that bit in the old black-and-white movie where the guy has the hose and he tries to squirt the other guy in the face, and no water comes out? So he holds the hose to his face to see the problem, and squirt! All over him. That's how I've spent too much of my time with Skate It.

It all sounds ideal. Skate, the reinvention of the skating game for 360 and PS3, was most notable for its controls. It took a gamepad and was really smart, mapping everything to the analogue sticks, and connecting you with the board. Given the Wii, and the variety of approaches available, there should be so much room for imaginative application. Whether the Wii just isn't capable, or whether EA didn't refine enough, it's hard to say, but Skate It is a frustration of decent ideas and controls that aren't precise enough.

If you've played Skate, you might be expecting a living, breathing metropolis to skate around. Forget all that. There's been a terrible earthquake in the hometown of San Van, and apparently it's killed everyone but you, some unseen pro-skaters, and an incredibly annoying idiot on the phone. The resulting damage is a city primed for tricks and grinds, fallen bridges and piles of rubble propping up opportunities for making lines. A skater's post-apocalyptic playground in jaggedy Wii graphics.

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Nintendo announces Wii Music date

Nintendo announces Wii Music date

Sorts out schedule for end of 2008.

Nintendo has made official noises about releasing Wii Music in Europe on 14th November.

This is the game Shigeru Miyamoto was playing on stage at E3, should you ever forget. Our hands-on impressions of Wii Music can fill you in on the rest.

EA has also locked down a release date for the Wii versions of 21st November for Skate It and Need For Speed: Undercover. We've not heard about the other versions of these, but they're unlikely to be too far from that.

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Skate It

Skate expectations.

Skate wasn't built for the DS and Wii, and that's presented EA with something of a problem. How can you get a gameworld filled with milling pedestrians and wide-open draw distances to work on less powerful hardware? Its solution with Skate It, due out later this year, is to bring in a series of "comical natural disasters" (their words, not ours) to kick the city of San Vanelona into more manageably angular chunks of geometry, and clear out ninety-nine percent of the original population. God may work in mysterious ways, then, but sometimes He can be alarmingly platform-specific.

Skate It

EA skateboarder goes portable.

EA skateboarder goes portable.