Advice on house hunting Page 163

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  • Psychotext 18 Dec 2017 12:06:21 62,249 posts
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    I'm looking forward to watching them carry my weights equipment. Actually interested to see how they deal with it.
  • GuybrushThreepwood 20 Dec 2017 10:13:22 1,562 posts
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    Last load from the old place in the car. Cleaning nearly done.

    Can easily say this is the nicest house I've ever lived in. I've never been in a four bedroom house in my life and the places I've owned have always been a bit.. Less than ideal. This place has my wife smiling all the time and telling me how much she loves it. It will be great to actually be able to enjoy it rather than feeling like a second arm of Pickfords and having boxes all over.

    However, even now, it feels great. Cats love all the windows to look out of and the space to explore and the fire is a new favourite hang out spot. Kids love having their own rooms and are making plans for what to do with them. Me, I love just having a dishwasher. I don't think that's getting old for some time. It also gives me something else to work for. Work is tough, so it's nice to think of what it's paying for.

    The whole process seems to have been simple enough in hindsight, but then I recall it being stressful at times, so that's rose tinted glasses I think. I feel like i was lucky though...I mean, I could have bought rob's house. He'll be screwed if the big bad wolf ever turns up. :)


    Thanks for the support during the process, it helped a lot.
  • robc84 20 Dec 2017 10:19:37 12,079 posts
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    @GuybrushThreepwood

    Congrats! Glad it's all worked out well for you mate.
  • the_milkybar_kid 20 Dec 2017 11:01:41 6,268 posts
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    @GuybrushThreepwood Nice one matey! Hope you have a lovely first Christmas and many happy years there.
  • Nitrous 21 Dec 2017 00:21:53 1,579 posts
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    Fire angle ST622 Smoke alarms... Don't buy.
    10 year fixed battery that doesn't last.

    Ours was going off yesterday and tonight it's beeping which means low battery. Couldn't get the unit off from the base plate to silence it because the previous owner had stuck the base plate up with no more nails jamming the locking mechanism. Being annoyed I managed to rip it of the ceiling along with some paper.

    The base plate is now usable but I'm not buying another of these. Anyone recommend something else? Hopefully big enough to cover the hole I made tonight with changeable batteries. Probably going to buy two as the one upstairs is also the same unit with a not so 10 year battery.
  • Mfolf 31 Dec 2017 18:43:24 1,836 posts
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    So we were originally going to put laminate down in living room and hall. This was due to cost and the fact we have a dog and didnít want to ruin good floor. I always felt a bit meh about the idea as we have a really bloody nice flat and wanted a real hardwood floor. With January sales, that is now very much an option. It will still far exceed our budget, even with the heavy discounts. But I reckon weíll be happier with it in the long run and it will add to value of house ultimately. Thoughts? Also, installation costs (roughly). Iím looking at around 25 and 15 square meters for both rooms. Whatís a rough ball park figure and time frame I should expect to be quoted?
  • elstoof 31 Dec 2017 19:10:07 19,158 posts
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    Whatís you budget per metre of flooring? What is the subfloor, is it straight onto the joists, concrete etc, will you be removing skirting and architraves to get a better finish?
  • Mfolf 31 Dec 2017 23:42:08 1,836 posts
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    I honestly donít know how to answer any of that. As far as cost of floor weíre kinda sorted with the actual floor. Just installation we need to sort.
  • Mr_Sleep 1 Jan 2018 09:17:57 21,462 posts
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    Maximum of £25 a metre. I would say £18 to £20 a metre is reasonable for just doing the floor but then these are London prices so maybe knock a couple of quid off depending on location.

    Regarding skirting boards, you will be required to either take them off and refit them after the floor is laid or use some beading as you require an expansion gap around the entire perimeter of the floor. There is some kind of skirting overlay system I have heard aboit but I haven't seen it on a job.
  • elstoof 1 Jan 2018 09:50:20 19,158 posts
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    Ah, gotcha, thought you hadnít decided on the floor itself.

    If youíre removing the old floor youíll be better off taking the skirtings off in the long run, as you can remove old and lay the new floor more easily, fitting new skirting after. Youíll also have to make good any wall damage from skirting removal, fit new skirtings and touch up the walls - if you donít know what paint colour the walls are, then youíll have to redecorate too. It can get expensive quite easily.


    If you want cheaper, then you can leave the skirting in place - you wonít be able to fit the new boards under the old skirting but any decent floor fitters can cut them pretty tight to the skirting, then pad out the front of the skirting with some strips of MDF. Quarter round beading looks like dog shit, so measure the flat edge of the skirting and get some wood cut to size, if the fitter got close to the skirting then you wonít need to add too much depth. Screw to the skirting, fill the holes, paint the lot white and youíre done

    Edited by elstoof at 10:06:57 01-01-2018
  • Mr_Sleep 1 Jan 2018 10:01:03 21,462 posts
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    Or you could use something like this:

    www.skirting4u.co.uk/mdf-skirting-board
  • The_Goon 3 Jan 2018 14:05:36 702 posts
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    Hmmmm, some of you chaps seem to know your flooring quite well. Is my hallway and study (and kitchen to a lesser degree) piss fucking cold because they are tiled and don't have underlay as a barrier against the cold (presumably concrete) foundation? We don't have a radiator in the hallway and it's making the whole house fucking cold I think.
  • Mfolf 3 Jan 2018 14:07:21 1,836 posts
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    Thanks for advice. Got a rough quote in meantime and they said around 450 all in (lounge and hallway). Just trying to decide on flooring. Bloody expensive and been advised there really isnít much difference in hardwood v engineered.
  • GuybrushThreepwood 3 Jan 2018 14:17:51 1,562 posts
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    @The_Goon The tiled floor will be producing the feeling of cold for sure, especially if its on a concrete floor. Have you thought of rugs on top?
  • mrpon 3 Jan 2018 14:41:01 33,922 posts
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    Or underfloor heating, it's lovely, especially at 30 degrees.
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 14:41:10 19,158 posts
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    Engineered all the way, stable wood for life. The only argument anyoneís got for solid wood is you can only sand it x amount of times before hitting the ply - weíll you can only sand any floor x number of times before itís too thin to function or you expose the tongue and groove. Make sure you get 20mm boards with 6mm surface wood and youíll be set
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 14:44:07 19,158 posts
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    Any floor will be cold regardless of material if itís cold underneath it, wood gets cold on the lowest floor in the house. You need more radiators, basically. Or bigger ones in place if your existing, increase the BTU output
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 14:45:23 19,158 posts
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    We got our engineered oak from a company called Peak Oak, nice people and good prices
  • Mr_Sleep 3 Jan 2018 15:01:48 21,462 posts
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    elstoof wrote:
    Engineered all the way, stable wood for life. The only argument anyoneís got for solid wood is you can only sand it x amount of times before hitting the ply - weíll you can only sand any floor x number of times before itís too thin to function or you expose the tongue and groove. Make sure you get 20mm boards with 6mm surface wood and youíll be set
    You should work in a wood flooring shop :) Spot on advice.

    Also, oiled or lacquered is another standard question. I always recommend oiled as it is relatively easy to do spot repairs oneself where as lacquer is a bit more complicated to get an even tone, really it's the job of a professional to sort of lacquered floors. Still, lacquer does not require the use of specific products to clean as it's a varnish and doesn't penetrate the wood.

    Regarding cost of floor, it very much depends on what sort of finish you are going for and where the wood is sourced but realistically you shouldn't spend more than £50 a sqm for fairly standard stuff, assuming you aren't getting some specialised finish.
  • The_Goon 3 Jan 2018 17:09:55 702 posts
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    elstoof wrote:
    Any floor will be cold regardless of material if itís cold underneath it, wood gets cold on the lowest floor in the house. You need more radiators, basically. Or bigger ones in place if your existing, increase the BTU output
    Presumably, though, wood/carpet flooring has an underlay and so has that insulating barrier, right? Maybe the difference won't be that drastic I guess. Underfloor heating would be nice but it would also be a massive/expensive job I think...
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 17:26:12 19,158 posts
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    Mr_Sleep wrote:

    Also, oiled or lacquered is another standard question.
    Is flooring your thing? Just finishing renovating my house now, had to do a fair bit of research. We went with one of those hard waxoils to finish our boards - really happy with the result, easy to apply, easy to touch up as it just blends in. Didnít want lacquer as that was on our last house and as soon as you chip or scratch it youíre fucked. Removing it is a right cunt as well

    Edited by elstoof at 17:27:28 03-01-2018
  • Mr_Sleep 3 Jan 2018 17:31:01 21,462 posts
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    @elstoof I work part time in a wood flooring shop. Mostly IT stuff but I do have to interact with the general public too.

    Did you do the oiling yourself rather than pre-finished boards?

    We did our stairs not that long ago, had a pine staircase put in and oiled the thing with an osmo walnut oil which looks lovely as it means it hasn't gone all orange as it would with a clear coat.
  • Mr_Sleep 3 Jan 2018 17:32:25 21,462 posts
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    Aye, lacquer had its uses in that one doesn't have to be careful about applying the correct cleaning products and it is relatively hard wearing but it scuffs pretty easily and as you say, it isn't fun to try and solve problems yourself. Oil is just so much easier.
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 17:35:17 19,158 posts
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    The_Goon wrote:
    elstoof wrote:
    Any floor will be cold regardless of material if itís cold underneath it, wood gets cold on the lowest floor in the house. You need more radiators, basically. Or bigger ones in place if your existing, increase the BTU output
    Presumably, though, wood/carpet flooring has an underlay and so has that insulating barrier, right? Maybe the difference won't be that drastic I guess. Underfloor heating would be nice but it would also be a massive/expensive job I think...
    Really depends on what your subfloor is, if itís tiled straight onto a concrete slab then carpet would probably help, but if youíve got plenty of heat output then that floor will also absorb and store some heat. The only barrier youíd put down for wood would be for moisture
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 17:41:59 19,158 posts
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    Mr_Sleep wrote:
    @elstoof I work part time in a wood flooring shop. Mostly IT stuff but I do have to interact with the general public too.

    Did you do the oiling yourself rather than pre-finished boards?

    We did our stairs not that long ago, had a pine staircase put in and oiled the thing with an osmo walnut oil which looks lovely as it means it hasn't gone all orange as it would with a clear coat.
    Yeah we site finished the boards after a light sanding, better in the long run I felt. Did about 75 metres in the ground floor and liked it so much weíve just laid another 25 in the loft, half of which got oiled yesterday. Good job weíre finishing on site as well, a radiator valve sprung a leak over Christmas and had to rub a few boards down to get rid of the black stain
  • monkehhh 3 Jan 2018 18:11:58 4,767 posts
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    Need to pick an engineered herringbone floor and I think I've got to the point where I need to stop looking at them for a while.. also having a similar issue with bloody kitchen worktops.
  • Mr_Sleep 3 Jan 2018 18:54:11 21,462 posts
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    @elstoof Doing it yourself would definitely be a better finish than many of the floors that come out of factories, they can be a bit vague with the amount and quality of oils used. You probably saved a little bit of money and gained a lot of satisfaction.

    Urgh, that's a bugger. Did you also avoid sweating on the boards while you were oiling them? Just wondering as sweat stops the boards from taking the oil so if you have any patches that aren't sap wood but just wont take the oil then it'll be that.
  • Mr_Sleep 3 Jan 2018 18:55:33 21,462 posts
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    @monkehhh What board length and width are you doing? Is it the colour you're stuck on?
  • elstoof 3 Jan 2018 19:24:40 19,158 posts
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    Applying the finish was childís play, so was laying them really. No sweat there. Ripping up the old pine boards in the heatwave was a killer though, with a deadline to get the new floor down in time for the kitchen fitter
  • Mr_Sleep 3 Jan 2018 19:43:56 21,462 posts
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    Did you nail them to the joists?
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