Outer space and related interests Page 14

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  • mal 15 Jul 2017 03:35:22 28,662 posts
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    Also, weird red dwarf (and it doesn't seem to be Kryten this time):

    http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43363.msg1702543

    More news hopefully tomorrow.
  • mal 21 Jul 2017 22:29:38 28,662 posts
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    They did take measurements last Sunday, but it took until today for them to publish first results:

    http://phl.upr.edu/press-releases/theweirdsignal

    So, it's looking increasingly like it's a geostationary satellite pulse that's maybe been bounced around through the atmosphere on its way down.

    Unsurprisingly, this hasn't gone down all that well on twitter:

    https://twitter.com/EricLagadec/status/888473824362078208

    https://twitter.com/ProfAbelMendez/status/888483542463729664
  • Fake_Blood 22 Jul 2017 01:30:33 7,915 posts
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    How does a greenhouse effect make water? How did the comets get their water?
    Also, Mars doesn't have a dark side, a martian day is like 30 mins longer than an earth day.
  • stephenb 22 Jul 2017 10:11:38 3,365 posts
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    @Fake_Blood

    Greenhouse effect generates humidity and moisture. Not to be confused with runaway Greenhouse effect which is what happened on Venus.

    I think he means night side of Mars where ice crystals will form as the temperature plummets, but not in huge quantities and normally evaporate at day break.

    edit : Although he says the atmosphere is gone it still has one, For a Space Monkey he's not explained anything particularly well :D

    Edited by stephenb at 10:21:14 22-07-2017
  • Fake_Blood 22 Jul 2017 10:51:23 7,915 posts
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    I guess what I don't get is when you start out with a glowing big ball of magma, how you eventually get water. Like if you have hydrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere, how do you get H2O? And if it comes from comets crashing in to earth, how did they get their water ice?
  • GuybrushThreepwood 22 Jul 2017 13:44:45 1,383 posts
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    @Fake_Blood the sun is - if i remember right - similar to a hydrogen bomb. It produces hydrogen and oxygen. There is water vapour present at sun spots for instance. Apparently solar winds can spread the hydrogen and oxygen and the solar system and i guess provide the energy to combine (as they think happened with the moon).
  • GuybrushThreepwood 22 Jul 2017 13:48:46 1,383 posts
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    Oh and i just checked, the majority of the earth's water was produced on earth by mantle based reactions of hydrogen and deuterium and something else I've forgotten the name of.

    Comets...no clue .
  • Fake_Blood 22 Jul 2017 14:01:06 7,915 posts
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    I don't think there's oxygen in the sun. It fuses hydrogen to helium.
    A lot of people forget that earth didn't look like earth does now for the majority of it's life. The first 3 billion years there was no oxygen on earth, it only started when there were bacteria in the oceans that produced oxygen as a byproduct. For which you need water of course. And only when there was oxygen did higher lifeforms develop because they could oxydize glucose in their cells, releasing much more energy. You couldn't have a functioning brain without oxygen for instance.
    I might be wrong, but even if there was oxygen and hydrogen in the atmosphere, I don't think you can make water with ultraviolet or other radiation. You can break molecules apart with radiation though.
  • Fake_Blood 22 Jul 2017 14:19:23 7,915 posts
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    Mantle based reactions? That's not nearly as exciting as I had hoped!
  • stephenb 22 Jul 2017 14:37:51 3,365 posts
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    Say what you like, that mantle is hot shit.
  • Fake_Blood 22 Jul 2017 15:15:10 7,915 posts
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    :D I always found the crust to be much cooler.

    Anyway, if anyone has nothing to do tonight and you'd like about 2 hours of science, here's one of the most interesting videos I've ever seen on youtube.
    It's the 2010 Asimov Debate asking the question -Is earth unique?
    It's got some pretty smart people, it's even funny at times, I highly recommend it.

  • JoeBlade 22 Jul 2017 16:48:57 4,119 posts
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    That's amazing, it's like a very elaborate TED talk. And there are more!
  • mal 22 Jul 2017 17:17:43 28,662 posts
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    The sun doesn't produce hydrogen, as Fake Blood correctly says. It does fuse that hydrogen on to helium, and can then fuse helium on to heavier elements including in theory oxygen. All of the heavier elements (than helium) were created in stellar events afaik. Presumably, free electrons and other bosons and muons in the initial universal hot soup combined to form lower energy hydrogen nuclei and then atoms, but anything much heavier takes a bigger kick to get into that state, even though once it's in that state it ends at a lower energy.

    If I'm remembering correctly, and it's getting hazier here, anything much heavier than iron takes something like a supernova to make. But anything up to iron, including oxygen can be made in a standard star like our sun. The stuff on our earth won't have come from our sun, but any previous generations of stars will have ejected that stuff when the die. Hydrogen is still the most abundant element in the universe, and I guess as the gas pools together under gravity, if that hydrogen ignites, it'll combine with any free oxygen and produce water, provided it doesn't get too hot to form plasma (which might not even be possible in a near vacuum, dunno). I think that's where most universal water comes from.

    It may be worth considering there was very little free oxygen on earth before the first great oxygenation event when algae grew out of the primordial soup and began to photosynthesise for the first time. Before that it was mostly in the form of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide and water are quite stable states, so probably quite common molecules in the universe.
  • Fake_Blood 23 Jul 2017 08:25:07 7,915 posts
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  • Fake_Blood 31 Aug 2017 11:20:23 7,915 posts
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    Some news about Fast Radio Bursts.

    Over the last couple of years radio telescopes caught a handful of stupidly strong, high frequency radio signals that only last for a few milliseconds.
    They always come from very far away (billions of light years) and are so energetic that the theories point to well, the most energetic events in the universe we can think off, like a neutron star pulsar getting sucked into a black hole. But if that would be the case we would see a lot more of them, and we should be able to detect some that are millions and not billions of light years away.

    And as always when non of the theories fit, people start thinking about little green men. This not helped by the fact that the duration of these bursts, short as they are, tends to be a multiple of 187.5

    Some things in nature happen at set energy intervals, like when an electron changes energy state in an atom, giving up a set value of energy at a set frequency. It does get harder to explain when we are talking about the energy levels these radio burst operate at.

    Anyway, the following article doesn't contain much info, besides the fact they detected 15 new bursts from the only source that's repeating them.
    There are some good links to related articles in there though.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2145822-weve-just-seen-15-new-mysterious-cosmic-radio-bursts-from-space/
  • Fake_Blood 6 Sep 2017 20:42:34 7,915 posts
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    The Sun (the big ball of plasma, not the newspaper) let out a noteworthy fart today, largest one in a decade. It was sort of pointed at earth, but they are not sure yet because:

    The orbiting Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, a joint project between NASA and the European Space Agency, is currently out of contact with Earth because of its location, so observers will not be able to see any coronal mass ejections caused by this morning's flares until 10:30 p.m. EDT (1830 GMT)



    Anyhow, depending on the speed we might see some effects in 1 to 3 days.
    Don't know about you guys, but I'm wrapping my balls in tinfoil as we speak.

    https://www.space.com/38057-sun-unleashes-decades-strongest-solar-flare.html



    Edited by Fake_Blood at 20:53:33 06-09-2017
  • Daryoon 6 Sep 2017 22:16:49 5,909 posts
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    Can't wait for Trump to threaten the Sun on Twitter when he finds out!
  • mal 7 Sep 2017 02:02:55 28,662 posts
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    Fake_Blood wrote:
    The Sun (the big ball of plasma, not the newspaper) let out a noteworthy fart today, largest one in a decade. It was sort of pointed at earth, but they are not sure yet because:

    That looks freakishly like Mr Shadow from the Fifth Element.
  • up_the_ante 29 Sep 2017 02:11:02 383 posts
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    NASA Delays Launch of James Webb Space Telescope to 2019

    I know it's only half a year or so, i.e. nothing in the grand scheme of things, but I'm quite disappointed by this. The James Webb is going to move our knowledge of the universe on leaps and bounds. In fact, if anything, that's a understatement. It will have the ability to look back far enough to the formation of the universe - something Hubble can't manage.
  • wobbly_Bob 29 Sep 2017 08:02:18 4,268 posts
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    @up_the_ante

    That's disappointing. Really excited about the James Webb scope. Been following it's progress for so long. With so many so many times it almost died si I'll be glad yo see it finally launch. Just a bit longer now.
  • riceNpea 29 Sep 2017 08:07:13 929 posts
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    Just get it right boys we can wait. Well, I can't wait but I can wait, you know what I mean.
  • ZuluHero 29 Sep 2017 09:11:45 5,969 posts
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    My daughter likes watching these planetarium shows aimed at kids, but explaining lots of interesting stuff about space, and there was one (with David Tenent, i think) talking about the James Webb telescope, saying about where its going, what it will do and some of the mission stuff.

    The show must be a good few years old now and we've seen it oodles of times (though still amazing to watch in a 360 theater) but I was wondering what was happening to the telescope.

    Edited by ZuluHero at 09:12:15 29-09-2017
  • Fake_Blood 29 Sep 2017 09:29:29 7,915 posts
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    Thing is they can’t service james webb like they did hubble, it’s too far up there.
    There’s an animation out there of how the thing folds open and it’s like a 500 step program. I think they are just making sure it doesn’t fuck up.
  • Rubbatiti 30 Sep 2017 21:03:30 19 posts
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    @SpaceMonkey77 We need more Musk's and less Zuckerbergs imo.
  • Khanivor 30 Sep 2017 21:17:34 43,423 posts
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    Just wait till Musk has his Mars colony and is safely ensconced there; that's when he will release the civilization-annihilating pandemic and finally cleanse the world of what he has always viewed as his goal to exterminate, ever since PayPal - humanity.
  • Fake_Blood 30 Sep 2017 22:03:57 7,915 posts
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    In any case, I think we should get a base on the moon before we go to mars. It looks like space-x wants to do both, because they are launching unmanned to mars in 2022 and manned in 2024. I don't see how you can get a base on the moon before 2024.
    Main issue I see is that if something goes wrong, you can get someone home from the moon in a matter of days, but mars it takes 6 months.

    So yeah, test your shit out on the moon, then go to mars would be my plan.
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