Rate the last book you read Page 75

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  • Tonka 8 Nov 2017 08:55:19 26,628 posts
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    Just to be absolutely clear, I think NK is a horrible tragedy.
  • nudistpete 8 Nov 2017 11:15:03 174 posts
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    Tonka wrote:
    I read an article about how many of the stories that have been told have been retracted or found out to be embellishments. Sadly, since there is no doubt the truth is horrifying enough.
    That's lunchtime reading for me sorted. Nothing to Envy is one of my favourite reads of the past few years, the story of the defector nurse who realises when she reaches China that dogs in China are fed better than people in North Korea still haunts me often.

    The Hyeonseo Lee book, The Girl with Seven names, is well worth a read as well as it chronicles in more detail how the Chinese government supports the NK government in repatriating defectors.
  • Mola_Ram 18 Nov 2017 06:59:43 16,543 posts
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    IT - Stephen King

    It's such a confident book, written by someone who clearly knows what he's doing. I loved the way it smoothly transitions between the different time periods, with one sentence starting in 1985 being finished in 1958. I loved the characters (though Richie is such an annoying piece of shit that I doubt I'd ever be friends with him).

    But man oh man, this thing was such a slog to get through at times. I remember getting to the bit where they're having a trippy Indian smoke dream, seeing that I was only 2/3 of the way through the book, and mentally screaming at King JUST FUCKING GET ON WITH IT ALREADY.

    But yeah, judging from a lot of the other stuff of his I've read (see: Dark Tower, The Stand, 11.22.63) I guess this is just how he writes. It's just indulgent, and I think many of his stories would be even better with 200-odd pages lopped off of them.
  • Mola_Ram 30 Nov 2017 01:42:04 16,543 posts
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    I'm almost finished with The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss.

    It took me a good while to get into it, partly because it started out with a personal fantasy bugbear of mine. Namely, it had a hero who was impossibly good at everything, learning entire languages in like 2 months, good with a sword, magic, music, first aid, alchemy, you name it. I find those characters mostly uninteresting, because I can never really believe that they'd be seriously challenged by anything. It didn't help that a good part of the book was flashback, so you knew that some conclusions were foregone.

    But, I did eventually come to like it (it really was rather well-written), and am more than happy enough to keep going with the sequels. Which I've heard are better.
  • Kazuhira 30 Nov 2017 02:24:39 33 posts
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    Post deleted
  • PazJohnMitch 30 Nov 2017 09:32:02 13,020 posts
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    Red County by Joe Abercrombie.

    Not as good as the First Law Trilogy whose World it is set in but considerably better than Best Served Cold which is also part of the series.
  • Tonka 7 Dec 2017 06:27:26 26,628 posts
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    Sourdough by Robin Sloan

    Best way to describe it is as a bastard child of Microserfs, Hanna (the movie, sans violence) and The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet.

    A young woman gets headhunted from her first job after colelge and goes to a buzzing robotics startup in SF. Needless to say she soon finds herself overworked. Cue mysterious sourdough starter that she gets from her favourite take away place. One thing leads to another and soon she finds herself in a very different set of circumstances.

    A delightful read
  • Mola_Ram 7 Dec 2017 10:18:25 16,543 posts
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    I'm just about done with my semi-regular re-reading of House of Leaves. I never really "finish" the book (for obvious reasons), but I always find some cool little detail that I missed before.

    It's funny that I keep going back to it, though, given that obsession is one of its major themes. I don't imagine that I'll ever really be done with it.
  • Tonka 7 Dec 2017 11:37:23 26,628 posts
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    First I ever heat of it. Looked it up on wikipedia and it sounds more like a project than a book.
  • Mola_Ram 7 Dec 2017 11:38:44 16,543 posts
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    It's a very unique reading experience.

    And also deeply, deeply unsettling. It's probably the scariest thing I've ever read, tbh.

    Edited by Mola_Ram at 11:40:46 07-12-2017
  • Tonka 7 Dec 2017 11:41:00 26,628 posts
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    Would it work as an e-book?
  • Mola_Ram 7 Dec 2017 11:45:14 16,543 posts
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    Tonka wrote:
    Would it work as an e-book?
    I don't think it would, to be honest. Or at least the experience of it would be very different as an e-book.

    And I say this as someone who loves e-books. It's just that House of Leaves is very much connected to the experience of reading it in book-form. You'll understand why if you flick through it.
  • Mola_Ram 7 Dec 2017 11:54:34 16,543 posts
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    It's also a hard book to talk about without sounding utterly pretentious. Which is another one of the things it makes fun of :p

    Edited by Mola_Ram at 11:59:02 07-12-2017
  • Tonka 7 Dec 2017 13:14:54 26,628 posts
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    The Fifth Season N. K. Jemisin

    I keep thinking that fantasy is all the same, yet most times when I read a fantasy book I'm impressed by how fresh and different it is. The Fifth season is no exception.

    A grim tale, well three to be specific, that gives the reader an uderstanding of how life in The Stillness is. It's a world that is extremely geologically active and every now and then a major cataclysmic earth shake triggers volcano eruptions that darkens the sky for years, sometimes decades, in what is called a fifth season.

    It's really, really good. Will read the other two in the series.
  • DukeSilver 7 Dec 2017 13:46:18 2,540 posts
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    Nomad by Alan Partridge. Alan follows the footsteps of his deceased father in a walk from Norwich to Dungeness nuclear power station where his father once had an interview. It's good but I preferred the other books. It makes jokes about unnecessary filler but there's actually quite a lot of filler. There's a section where he goes into great detail about scratching his arse (which was very funny to be fair). I give it 7/10.
  • robthehermit 7 Dec 2017 15:23:20 6,219 posts
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    Mola_Ram wrote:
    I'm almost finished with The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss.

    But, I did eventually come to like it (it really was rather well-written), and am more than happy enough to keep going with the sequels. Which I've heard are better.
    Make sure you read Wise Man's Fear very, very slowly. The rest of us have been waiting nearly 7 years for the final book in the trilogy.
  • onestepfromlost 7 Dec 2017 19:08:02 2,639 posts
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    robthehermit wrote:
    Mola_Ram wrote:
    I'm almost finished with The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss.

    But, I did eventually come to like it (it really was rather well-written), and am more than happy enough to keep going with the sequels. Which I've heard are better.
    Make sure you read Wise Man's Fear very, very slowly. The rest of us have been waiting nearly 7 years for the final book in the trilogy.
    Yeah this!

    Never heard of house of leaves, but it looks like a fascinating concept, i think im going to treat myself to it today.
  • Mola_Ram 10 Dec 2017 05:19:02 16,543 posts
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    robthehermit wrote:
    Mola_Ram wrote:
    I'm almost finished with The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss.

    But, I did eventually come to like it (it really was rather well-written), and am more than happy enough to keep going with the sequels. Which I've heard are better.
    Make sure you read Wise Man's Fear very, very slowly. The rest of us have been waiting nearly 7 years for the final book in the trilogy.
    It's weird. I finished the first one a few days ago, but I've become increasingly soured on it since then, with lessening desire to continue.

    I think it's because, on reflection, I just do not like the main character. And because he's not just the main character but pretty much the *only* character that gets any sort of development - it's all told from his perspective, after all - my enjoyment of the book depends very much on whether I like him. It's not like, say, Game of Thrones, where it doesn't matter if I hate Jon Snow because there's dozens of other characters to get attached to.

    With this, my distaste is partly because I find "good at everything" characters pretty boring overall. But also because his interactions with the main girl make me think that Patrick Rothfuss has never talked to a real woman in his life.

    I think the Broken Empire series is better at getting me to like the narrator - particularly Prince of Thorns and King of Thorns.

    Edited by Mola_Ram at 09:03:49 12-12-2017
  • CosmicFuzz 12 Dec 2017 07:40:08 32,061 posts
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    Mola_Ram wrote:
    I'm just about done with my semi-regular re-reading of House of Leaves. I never really "finish" the book (for obvious reasons), but I always find some cool little detail that I missed before.

    It's funny that I keep going back to it, though, given that obsession is one of its major themes. I don't imagine that I'll ever really be done with it.
    I just finished House of Leaves myself. Really enjoyed it, very different and unsettling in parts. Although I did find my attention wandering during some of the Johnny story; his stream of consciousness sometimes didn't quite work for me.

    But super impressive piece of work. Will definitely read it again.
  • Mola_Ram 12 Dec 2017 09:00:01 16,543 posts
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    Yeah, the Johnny Truant stuff is probably the weakest part of the whole thing. I like his little interjections into the other bits, but don't find his story particularly interesting.
  • simpleexplodingmaybe 12 Dec 2017 09:37:48 4,955 posts
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    Reading JK Rowling's Robert Galbraith detective novels at the moment.

    I'm not really a reader of proper genre-fiction crime novels but I'm enjoying these. Feels like Rowling is more invested in Robin the secretary than Strike the detective which is fair enough since he's a proper trope-y genre protagonist.
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