SpaceChem

Key events

Pay-what-you-want indie games site launches, spotlights SpaceChem

Pay-what-you-want indie games site launches, spotlights SpaceChem

IndieGameStand to sell a different DRM-free title every four days.

There's lots to love about newly-launched site IndieGameStand. Every four days it will highlight a new indie title and make it available to buy at a price of your choosing.

Games are available DRM-free, and a portion of the money you spend will go to charity.

The current spotlighted title is Eurogamer 9/10-scoring SpaceChem, on sale for just 96 hours. After that, another game will replace it.

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GOG.com relaunched to sell newer PC games

GOG.com relaunched to sell newer PC games

Drops the Good Old Games meaning.

What began as Good Old Games, GOG.com, has relaunched to sell new PC games alongside old.

Therefore, the Good Old Games meaning will fade away. The company will be known instead by the acronym-turned-company-title GOG.com. "It doesn't matter what G, O and G stand for," explained a post on GOG.com. "Gee Oh Gee dot com stands for high-quality, DRM-free gaming, each week with bigger and newer games."

Trine and The Whispered World are examples of 'new' games available right now. Legend of Grimrock is out 11th April. Spacechem, Machinarium and Darwinia are "coming soon". Apparently, more than 20 indie and new games have been signed for release in "the next few months".

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SpaceChem free update details

SpaceChem free update details

Level editor! Challenges! Leaderboards!

Eurogamer-loved atomic puzzler SpaceChem is getting an explosion of new content.

A level editor leads the free additions, and allows budding scientists to concoct their own research assignments and share them with others.

On top of that you'll find 12 new levels, leaderboards, Steam Achievements and puzzles hiding a Moustachiam Alloy unlockable for Team Fortress 2.

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SpaceChem

SpaceChem

Up and atom.

SpaceChem and Super Meat Boy. One is a game of atomic engineering, the other is about a skinless kid and his hot girlfriend. There's not too much common ground there, except on this essential level: they both nail the "Look what I made!" factor.

Overcome a challenge in either of these games, and you get the urge to call someone into the room, point at the screen and proclaim, "Look what I made!" In the case of Meat Boy, the player-created masterpieces were video replays of your death-cheating exploits; SpaceChem provides a more cerebral counterpart. You build tiny chemical reactors that scoop up atoms and rearrange them into new compounds to advance the interests of your industrial overlords. It sounds dry, but man, is it a kick to watch those atoms go.

The root problem of each stage in SpaceChem is to design a "reactor" that will refine raw atoms and/or molecules into a new compound. Your reactor might be connected to an atmospheric pump that provides you with a 3:1 ratio of hydrogen and nitrogen atoms, and the goal is to cobble these together into yup, you guessed it ammonia fuel.

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