City of Heroes Reviews

Physical Education

Physical Education

What went wrong and what next for the beleaguered PhysX card.

Testing a theory, I conducted an experiment. Calling up a friend who plays PC games but whose technical knowledge ends at realising that he needs to buy (or beg me to build for him) a faster machine every few years, I enquired as to whether he had a physics card. As predicted, he was frightened and confused by the question. Without one, he asked, was his PC somehow incapable of physics? But he could use the gravity gun in Half-Life 2. That had physics, right? So what was he missing, oh God what was he missing? I might as well have asked him if his rig had a water card, or a skin processor. Attempts to explain the purpose of the physics card didn't help greatly, and only further highlighted one of the factors keeping the nascent tech dead in the water. The Ageia PhysX physics accelerator card is trying to fix a problem that no-one thinks they have.

This week saw the release of Cellfactor: Revolution, a game originally intended to be a full-blooded celebration of PhysX. If you've played it, without or without an add-in physics card, you'll know that, despite some impressive parlour tricks, it's not a game - it's just a fancy tech demo riddled with problems. Given the year old PhysX's failure to set the world on non-framerate-bothering fire, it's all-too-easy to speculate that Cellfactor's original ambition has been brutally castrated. Why spend all that cash and developer brainjuice on a promotional tool for something that seems to have failed already? The card had a disastrous start last year. Its first big game, Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter, initially ran worse when PhysXed up, while a public beta of Cellfactor was quickly hacked to run almost all its gimmicks without the card. Since then, it's all been a bit quiet, and there's very few outside of its parent company Aegia who currently feel the physics processing unit has a long and prosperous future.

PhysX, of course, isn't dead yet, and even if it does pass away quietly in the night, Ageia will survive for a while offering its software physics engine to developers as a rival to the more established Havok. This offers the same kind of floppy bodies and bouncing crates as is possible using the hardware acceleration of the card, but on a less grand scale and at greater in-game speed cost. At any rate, this piece is not intended to be a burial, but rather a fitness test for what may well turn out to be a final tour of duty.

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City of Heroes

City of Heroes

More ill-advised spandex than a The Darkness tribute band convention.

On the main forum which I while away my working hours, there's a thread. It's about City of Heroes, though is currently named "City of Hot Mammas". That'll have inevitably changed by the time this review hits the net-presses; the moderators are taking great joy at changing it randomly whenever boredom strikes, just to keep things interesting. At the time of writing, it's just shy of 1,500 posts. Cute, you may think, but no biggie.

What's interesting is that the forum is nothing whatsoever to do with videogames. Just a standard - if wittier than most - gathering point online, where there are enough people to amass a gargantuan thread full of stories of superheroic adventure.

In other words, City of Heroes is a runaway success, and there's nothing that this review could do to change it. And, y'know... good. Cryptic deserve every single subscriber account they've amassed. Yay them.

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