Cell:emergence

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Cell: Emergence Review

Cell: Emergence Review

Going viral.

You're in trouble. A sheet of precious tissue was contaminated while your back was turned and the empurpled infection is spreading like biological wildfire. In a heartbeat, you've whipped your tiny nanobot into attack position and are lancing the stuff. One, two, three clicks of the mouse see the infection dissolving into a jaundiced yellow goo, leaving a gaping hole where flesh once was. You're panicking now, searching the infection site for traces and acutely aware of all the catastrophes that may be happening outside your camera's tragically human limits. The South American girl you're inside makes a mournful, booming noise. She is crying.

Dr. Mario never had days like this.

Welcome to Cell: Emergence, an indie game for PC and Xbox Live about battling disease on a nano scale in an environment that's destructible, but also capable of rampant growth. Terrifying growth. These are just a few interesting things about it.

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Deus Ex writer on cancelled Ninja Gold

Deus Ex writer on cancelled Ninja Gold

"Did branching narrative right," says Pacotii.

Ninja Gold, the cancelled Junction Point-developed movie-tie, could have moved the art of the branching narrative in games forward by a decade, according to its writer.

Sheldon J. Pacotti, who was the principle writer on the first two Deus Ex games, told Eurogamer as part of an interview looking back on the Deus Ex series that Ninja Gold aimed to make the entire game structure change based on player decisions.

"Like any action title there was a lot of unknowns in terms of how the team was going to be able to ramp up to really build it, all the art and the interactions," he said.

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Deus Ex writer announces Cell: emergence

Deus Ex writer announces Cell: emergence

PC and XBLIG based on voxels.

Sheldon Pacotti, the video game developer who wrote the first two Deus Ex games, has revealed his indie game, Cell: emergence.

Cell: emergence, due out before the end of September on PC and the Xbox Live Indie Games platform, is based on voxels. You pilot a nanobot through the body of a sick little girl, melting infections with self-replicating colloids, building shields and pathways with buckyfibers, and shredding germs with monofilament daisycutter depth-charges. Or something.

"The visual style looks low-fi and even retro, but that is because the bulk of the processing is dedicated to a deep simulation that extends down to every voxel in the world," he told Eurogamer.

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