BioShock: The Collection Features

FeatureThe impossible architecture of video games

Bang head against wall of text.

There is a saying in architecture that no building is unbuildable, only unbuilt. Structures may be impossible in the here and now, but have the potential to exist given enough time or technological development: a futuristic cityscape, a spacefaring megastructure, the ruins of an alien civilisation. However, there are also buildings that defy the physical laws of space. It is not an issue that they could not exist, but that they should not. Their forms bend and warp in unthinkable ways; dream-like structures that push spatial logic to its breaking point.

FeatureThe genius of Rapture

A deep dive on BioShock's underwater city to celebrate its 10-year anniversary.

It's now 10 years since we first plunged deep into the Atlantic Ocean and were beguiled by BioShock and the submarine city of Rapture, one of the finest environments in games.

Editor's note: Jordan Erica Webber is co-author with Eurogamer contributor Daniel Griliopoulos of the weighty tome Ten Things Video Games Can Teach Us: (about life, philosophy and everything), out this month. We've asked her to write a few thoughts on video games as works of philosophy. Beware: there are spoilers for Soma, the Mass Effect and Fallout series ahead.

Yeah alright, cards on the table. We couldn't find anyone in the office who hadn't played the original Bioshock. Which is hardly surprising when you're talking about a group of games journalists (incidentally, what would the collective noun for that be? A thinkpiece? A scribble? An ornery of games journos? Anyway.) The problem with that is it kind of scuppered my plans for recording a spectacularly well-timed episode of Late to the Party, to celebrate the shocking-but-not-really announcement that Bioshock: The Collection, a remastered edition of Bioshock, Bioshock 2 and Bioshock: Infinite, is heading to Xbox One, PC and PS4.