Arx Fatalis

Arx Fatalis dev's new studio

Arkane opens US office.

Arkane Studios, the developer behind action RPG Arx Fatalis and forthcoming PC title Dark Messiah of Might and Magic, has opened a new office in Austin, Texas.

Arx Fatalis

Arx Fatalis

We buried Ronan alive, but he still found something to write about.

Version Reviewed

Xbox (also available on PC)

Publisher

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Arx Fatalis

Arx Fatalis

Review - you know, Westerners make RPGs too, as Rob's been discovering

First-person role playing games have something of a patchy history, with examples ranging from the superb Deus Ex through the arguably mediocre Morrowind to the lamentably bad Kings Field series. Created by continental developers Arkane Studios, Arx Fatalis is the latest addition to this genre; the question being whether it scales the heights of Deus Ex, or plumbs the depths of the execrable Kings Field. Up your Arx While Morrowind immediately impressed players with graphical excellence, Arx Fatalis starts off rather less promisingly, with our hero character bashing his bonce and ending up in a murky prison cell, lacking both clothing and his memory. Not exactly an innovative backstory, although the high concept of the game - a world whose sun died, leading to the construction of huge underground cities beneath the mountains while the surface is locked in perpetual ice and darkness - is an interesting one, bringing to mind particularly Brian Aldiss' fantastic Helliconia novels. After breaking out of your cell, the game leads you around by the nose for a couple of hours, learning the ropes of the world into which you have been introduced. The level of interaction is certainly better than most RPGs, with potential uses for just about everything in the world, and your character skills are very open to adjustment, allowing you to learn handy tricks such as lock picking, powerful magic or better persuasion when bartering for goods. All the statistical staples RPG fans will expect are present and correct, while the first person setting is used to good effect in terms of puzzles and hidden areas. Wanted: Dark God, GSOH, for fun and maybe more The primary plot of Arx Fatalis is a complex one, and has the obligatory raising of Dark Gods and Terrible Evils Which Threaten The World (TM). Interestingly, though, Arkane has opted to make the plot quite linear, and while there's always plenty to do on the side, the main path of the game is always fairly clear. In many ways, we prefer this to the open-ended nature of something like Morrowind, which seemed very clever for a few hours and then became quite dull once we realised that although things were happening, they were happening very slowly indeed. Arx Fatalis keeps the pace up and keeps the progress of the story interesting, which is in many ways a vital feature of a good RPG. Other vital features, of course, are good magic and combat systems - of which Arx, sadly, delivers only one. The combat system is vastly disappointing, making almost no use whatsoever of the first-person mechanics available to the creators, with shockingly poor collision detection and physics. Obviously RPG combat is inherently stats-based, but in this instance you might as well be clicking on your enemies with a mouse pointer a la Diablo, rather than waving a sword in first-person mode. To be fair, no first person RPG with the exception of Deus Ex has really managed this problem particularly well, but it's disappointing nonetheless that combat is so lacklustre. It's a kind of magic What isn't lacklustre by any means is the magic system, which takes its cue from the mouse gestures used to cast spells in Black and White. Spells are built up from a collection of runes, which are generally hidden away in hard-to-find places around the game, and are cast by doing the correct series of rune-gestures onscreen. Cleverly, you can pre-cast a certain number of spells and store them as hotkeys, which is a very useful ability for combat, although once you've become proficient at casting you probably won't bother. Each new rune you find opens up a variety of new possibilities for spells, making this into one of the most interesting systems in the game. Graphically, Arx Fatalis won't be challenging the throne of Morrowind any time soon, but it's certainly acceptable in terms of rendering impressive, gloomy indoor environments. The game's creatures and characters are also nicely drawn - a little too nicely in some cases, with this (mildly arachnophobic) reviewer finding the giant spiders which infest certain areas of the game a little bit too realistic for his liking. Yes, I know, I'm a big girl's blouse... The audio is also good, with a generally high standard of voice acting and sound effects. Sadly, the main characters voice is downright annoying, but the incidental characters more than compensate for this mistake. Does my Arx look big in this? Arx Fatalis is a huge, sprawling game, with loads of sub-systems to explore and master and a compelling plot to drive you forward. In many ways this game is superior to Morrowind; although it doesn't have the initial appeal offered by that title's graphical splendour, it has a lot more depth and far less time is spent walking from place to place aimlessly. As a dungeon-crawling RPG, it's a lot of fun, so if that's your sort of thing - and you don't mind dealing with the quirks of an occasionally poorly-implemented first person viewpoint - then it's definitely worth checking out. Arx Fatalis preview (PC) Arx Fatalis screenshots (PC) 7

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Arx Fatalis

Preview - "the game Ultima Underworld fans have been waiting for"?

Arkane Studios Publisher Fishtank Interactive / Jo Wood There are plenty of games keeping role-playing fans busy as of late, and the stream of quality titles doesn't seem like it's about to relent either. Currently in development by Arkane Studios in France, Arx Fatalis looks set to continue the expansion of an already monstrous genre. Being billed as "the game Ultima Underworld fans have been waiting for" obviously sets expectations fairly high, but first impressions indicate that Arx Fatalis is indeed something to watch out for. Where Am I? The short introduction doesn't really offer much explanation as to why you start the game shut away in a dingy cell guarded by a skulking goblin, and the loss of your character's memory certainly doesn't serve to clue you up much either, although a quick natter with another prisoner reveals that you belong to the population of a medieval city called Arx, which was driven underground as the sun disappeared from the sky and the landscape above was turned into an icy wasteland. As your character has no idea who he is or what he's doing locked up in a dungeon cell, this sets the scene for a fascinating and intriguing story which slowly unravels as you progress. Your first priority is, of course, to escape your captor and get out of the jail. The small series of tasks you need to perform to do this serve as a fairly minimal tutorial into the control of your character and an introduction to your inventory and combat systems. Picking up and storing items is pretty straightforward, with any item you can pick up drag-and-drop-able into your inventory. Movement is much as you would expect from a first person shooter, except that it requires you to hold down a button to alternate between the mouselook combat functions and the pointer interface which lets you interact with objects. This feels overly complex and clumsy compared to something like System Shock, Deus Ex or Thief, and it's baffling why Arkane went for something that feels so .. primitive. Combat involves holding down the right mouse button whilst charging up your attack with the left, and simultaneously avoiding your enemy and attempting to line up a decent attack. Frankly, it all proves to be more of a chore than it should be, and I began to think that escaping from jail and beating a goblin to death with a bone would actually be easier in real life. Spellbinding One part of the control system that does work splendidly, however, is your character's spell-casting ability. Throughout the game you can find magic runes with shapes inscribed on them, which are stored in your spellbook. Once you have memorised the combinations of shapes, you merely hold down a spell button and draw the shapes in the air to cast the appropriate spell. The system is fabulously easy to pick up and is extremely forgiving should you be particularly dreadful at drawing with the mouse, unlike the similar method used in Black & White. Arx Fatalis is also an extremely good-looking game. It's hard to explain just how well Arkane have managed to recreate a menacing underground world; the feeling of dread and uncertainty as you tread your first steps through the catacombs is thanks to an astoundingly atmospheric darkness, punctuated only by flickering torchlight, which envelops you and draws you into the game. The textures are also absolutely superb and serve to compliment the extraordinary detail, which is consistent throughout the levels. It looks like Arkane are onto a winner here. It's unlikely that they're going to make any fundamental changes to the interface at this late stage, but as long as the rest of the game lives up to the promise of the opening sections then any niggles with the controls are likely to fade into insignificance. I urge you to keep your pennies aside for its scheduled second quarter release. Update - Many of the control niggles we experienced with this early beta of Arx Fatalis apparently will be remedied in the final version after all, including the ability to toggle between the combat and adventure interfaces, rendering the control of your character in both modes decidedly easier. - Arx Fatalis Screenshots