Picture of Rob Fahey

Rob Fahey

Contributor

Silent Hill: Shattered Memories

Don't go breaking my heart.

Silent Hill has never been the most commercially successful series, but it's hard to overestimate how important it has been to games - and how highly regarded it is by its fans. By ignoring B-movie zombies and endless cheap shocks in favour of an extraordinary atmosphere, memorable characters, oppressive, grinding music and a creeping sense of dread, it crafted a horror experience that was both clever and deeply unsettling. The series reached its narrative peak in Silent Hill 2, but the first game already showed the talent behind the team's storytelling. The mystery behind Silent Hill may have been occasionally mind-bending as it unravelled, but at heart it told a story about fanaticism, suffering and revenge which worked beautifully.

Making MMOs Massive

The demand matches the challenge.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Portable Positioning

Sony's new PSP will need to dazzle.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Mobile Revolution

iPhone's success has changed the landscape forever.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Shake, Rattle, Roll

If more motion controllers show at E3, all eyes should be on the software.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Duke Nukem Forever

End of an error.

Where were you in April 1997? It's a little over 12 years ago. Perhaps you were still at university, or just starting your first job. Some of you won't remember at all.

Halo 3 Mythic Map Pack

Packing it in.

This, we're led to believe, is the end: the final set of downloadable maps for Halo 3. Despite the game's continuing success on Xbox Live, Bungie reckons there's enough meat on those multiplayer bones to keep us all going. So, with the possible exception of some new stuff (unconfirmed, as yet) in Halo 3: ODST later this year, the Mythic Map Pack is the swansong for Halo 3 multiplayer.

War Games

Games have every right to explore modern wars, but they must tread with care.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

The Forbidden Kingdom

China represents a great opportunity if the obstacles can be overcome.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

The Big, Fat Question

Linking child obesity with games has caused outrage, but the criticism is fair.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Punched Out?

The British Government's claim to champion digital and creative industries rings very hollow.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Wheelman

Vin driver.

Say what you like about Vin Diesel's movie career, the man has avoided blotting his copybook when it comes to videogames. It helps that his game production company, Tigon, has only released one title so far - the critically acclaimed Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay.

High Street Blues

It's a dreadful time to be a high street retailer - and it's only going to get worse.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Uphill Struggle

Sony's expected operating loss isn't the PS3's fault, but that's where the blame will rest.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

The Chronicles of Spellborn

Humble origins.

The Chronicles of Spellborn is at its weakest when it lapses into the familiar. Level-up dings replete with swirly animation and several minutes spent contemplating where to spend points. Courier quests. With a shoestring budget and no significant publishing muscle behind it, it's an MMO that can ill-afford comparisons to WOW and WAR. Fortunately, this sort of thing is relatively uncommon. It may be guilty of reaching back into established convention for support, but for the most part Spellborn strides out into unknown territory.

How Big is Big Enough?

Lack of scale and weak management spells the end for smaller publishers.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

The Trader's Dilemma

The industry says it can't live with second-hand. It can't live without it.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Growing the Long Tail

New business models are finally weaning the industry off transient hits.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Taming the Gorilla

Now more than ever, EA needs to steel itself for the changes ahead.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Lips

All singing, some dancing.

If music be the food of love, then karaoke is... What, exactly? A cheap, vaguely guilty but widely enjoyed pleasure - the kebab of romance? The battered sausage of passion?

The Chronicles of Spellborn

A dodgy new MMO. In a good way.

There's a fatalistic sense of Daniel and the lion about what Spellborn International is set to do. World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King to one side, Warhammer Online to the other, and a compelling line-up of single-player games flooding the shops, and The Chronicles of Spellborn is out on 27th November. Actually, it's like watching those YouTube videos where a curious mouse runs around a glass tank, but you know there's a tarantula in that hollow log.

Eat Lead: The Return of Matt Hazard

Back before you knew he was gone.

Eat Lead's subtitle is "The Return of Matt Hazard" - which may leave more observant game fans scratching their heads a little. The point, you see, is that Matt Hazard was never actually gone. Or here, for that matter. He's a fictional action game hero making a "return" so heavily laden with gaming in-jokes that they threaten to overwhelm even Matt's implausibly meaty shoulders.

London Calling

Publishers need to stop talking amongst themselves and start addressing the crowd.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

Funcom's Craig Morrison

Conan's new emissary speaks.

After a promising launch and a depressingly rocky first four months, it's all change at the top for Funcom's Age of Conan. The game's original director, Gaute Godager, is gone; his seat (probably still warm) promptly filled by Funcom veteran Craig Morrison.

Hated and Broken

Everyone hates DRM, but not everyone will admit it doesn't work.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

"In the next six to twelve months, Age of Conan will live or die on how successfully Funcom can address these issues." That's how we closed off our initial review of Age of Conan - acknowledging grave flaws, but with immense optimism thanks to an early flurry of patches which steadily improved the game, week on week.

Big in Japan

Sony has much to prove at TGS - but Microsoft will be closely watched, too.

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

The Art of Fable 2

Lionhead's artists down brushes for a pre-release chat.

Fable 2 is so close, you can almost taste it. After what seemed like endless delays and date slips, the first game won the hearts of many with its charming presentation, surprisingly open world and the ability to be a bisexual bigamist who sacrificed innocent villagers. At least that's how we played it.

MySims Kingdom

An audience with the rulers.

It's one of the most successful videogames in history - so successful, in fact, that publisher Electronic Arts has an entire business unit devoted to it. It propelled creator Will Wright from geek hero to media darling, and earned him a reputation as the medium's Spielberg. Yet for Tim LeTourneau, The Sims has one glaring problem.

Legendary

All the better to eat you with, my dear.

Calling your game "Legendary" is really just asking for people to take a pop at you. For a generation brought up to see the phrase as a description of slightly dubious excellence - Chuck Norris being probably the most apt recipient of the title - rather than a reference to mythology, you might as well call the game "Fantastic" or "Bloody Marvellous". It's just a bit assumptive, you know? A bit of a liberty.