Picture of Richard Leadbetter

Richard Leadbetter

Technology Editor, Digital Foundry

Rich has been a games journalist since the days of 16-bit and specialises in technical analysis. He's commonly known around Eurogamer as the Blacksmith of the Future.

Digital FoundryThe Intel and AMD partnership: what does it mean for gamers?

Digital Foundry on one of the biggest announcements in PC gaming history.

After years of predictable roadmaps and often iterative bumps in existing technology, the last 12 months has seen some radical jumps in the capabilities of PC hardware - but few could have predicted yesterday's announcement that Intel and AMD would join forces to take on Nvidia in the laptop space. A new range of Kaby Lake G processors are set to ship in the coming months, combining an Intel Core i7 processor with a semi-custom Radeon GPU and a stack of HBM2 memory. So why has this collaboration come about and what does it mean for the gamer?

Digital FoundrySomething's not right with Titanfall 2 on Xbox One X

Dynamic res scales beyond 4K - but intense scenes look better on PS4 Pro.

Titanfall 2 made big headlines for Xbox One X during the preview period, when Respawn Entertainment's Drew McCoy noted that the game's dynamic scaler hit a maximum of 6K resolution during pre-production testing. The Xbox One X patch dropped last week, but it's clear that something isn't quite right with the upgrade. While enhancements are present, repeatable tests in the campaign can see resolution drop lower than the PlayStation 4 Pro version, producing a noticeably blurrier presentation in many scenes.

Well, that came out of nowhere! On Monday afternoon, the official Metal Gear Solid Twitter feed revealed that a PlayStation 4 Pro patch for MGS5 was imminent, the upgrade landing in the early hours of Tuesday morning. As huge fans of the title, we were excited to see what kind of upgrades Sony's higher-spec PlayStation 4 could deliver. The end result is somewhat lacking in ambition, but it's better than nothing and at the very least, it's a good opportunity to revisit what remains an excellent title.

Digital FoundryTech Interview: Destiny 2 and Bungie's return to PC gaming

How Bungie's engine evolved for the sequel, and why the game runs so well on PC.

We first went hands-on with the PC version of Destiny 2 at E3 earlier this year, and it was immediately apparent that this wasn't just a mere port or conversion, but instead a thoughtful, considered approach to the platform with all of the unique features and opportunities it represents. Back then, we mentioned to Bungie that we'd really like to go deeper on the game, the technology added to the firm's multiplatform engine, as well as learning more about the approach to bringing the game to PC. Four months later, Bungie's senior technical artist Nate Hawbaker has flown over from Seattle, joining us in the Digital Foundry office.

Digital FoundryDigital Foundry unboxes the final retail Xbox One X

Plus: details on upcoming review coverage.

It's happening. Digital Foundry has received its Xbox One X review unit and behind the scenes, our exploration of the hardware and its capabilities is beginning to take shape. But for now at least, it's all about the unboxing, a time-honoured ritual we've filmed for you and embedded on this page. Spoilers: expect a console, controller and possibly some cables within. To add some spice, we've included some physical form factor comparisons with PlayStation 4 Pro and prior Xbox One hardware.

Destiny 2 is out now, and as established by a successful beta test, this is an exceptionally streamlined version of the game. Ticking off virtually every box an enthusiast PC gamer could want from a multi-platform release, the beauty of Destiny 2 on PC is the sheer range of options open to the player. If you want a console-style experience, you can have it - but the point is that PC hardware has the potential to offer so much more. Beyond the expected graphical improvements, field of view adjustments, arbitrary resolution functionality and ultra-wide monitor support, Destiny 2 scales beautifully across high-end kit, making it a great match for high frequency displays. For its return to the PC space, Bungie is clearly on a mission.

Digital FoundryAtaribox: Ouya 2.0, evolved Steam Machine or something more?

What would it take for PC hardware to challenge consoles in the living room?

Atari broke cover this week, revealing more about its planned console, dubbed Ataribox. Useful detail is thin on the ground, but we know that it's using a custom AMD processor, that it's based on the open source Linux platform and will cost a minimum of $250. So just what can we expect from the machine - and by extension, can PC technology ever dominate living room gaming?

Digital FoundryDigital Foundry: Hands-on with Switch's 'impossible' Doom port

And can a PC specced to match Nintendo's hybrid deliver the same experience?

Just how powerful is Nintendo Switch and what are its limits? From Digital Foundry's perspective, it's been fun - and fascinating - to see the evolution of the platform, our expectations of the core Tegra X1 processor's capabilities exceeded by several key releases. But a Switch conversion of the Doom 2016 reboot? That's on a whole new level, and we had to check it out. We went hands-on with the game for about 40 minutes last week, our key question being: just how did they do that?

Digital FoundryRise of the Tomb Raider shines in HDR on Xbox One X

And Digital Foundry has the gameplay capture to prove it.

A couple of weeks ago, Microsoft began its latest global media tour, primarily to promote Xbox One X. While the range of games available to check out was essentially a subset of the impressive Gamescom line-up, we did have the opportunity to get direct feed capture of a range of titles that we'll be covering over the next week, starting with Rise of the Tomb Raider. We've already posted our initial thoughts on the Gamescom demo (and we have more coverage planned) but for now, we thought we'd kick off with a look at the game's breathtaking HDR support.

Digital FoundryAMD Radeon RX Vega 64 review

The red team brings the fight to GTX 1080 - but is that enough?

We've already taken a look at the excellent Radeon RX Vega 56, the cut-down version of the full-fat graphics card reviewed here today - and it's a winner. A couple of outliers aside, it's as fast as Nvidia's GTX 1070 or significantly faster and it easily overclocks to push further ahead. It's AMD at its best - competitive, disruptive and adding value - but the same can't quite be said for the RX Vega 64. It's a good product overall and it's competitive enough with Nvidia, but it offers no knockout blow - in the here and now, at least.

Microsoft is planning a quiet revolution in the way that games are streamed and installed onto Xbox One and Xbox One X. The new system - known internally as Intelligent Delivery - aims to save hard drive space and reduce download times by allowing users to only download the assets they'll actually need, as opposed to the complete game package. The platform holder has already dropped some hints about this functionality, confirming that Xbox One users won't need to download X's 4K assets, but the execution goes beyond that, being flexible enough even to support multi-disc releases - not currently supported on Xbox One.

Digital FoundryiPhone X: Apple bets the future of smartphones on Kinect's failed tech

Face ID shares DNA with Xbox's unloved camera - and seems to have similar problems.

Sooner or later we knew we'd reach this point. Apple's newly revealed iPhone X is the first $1000/Ł1000 smartphone, arriving with a slew of features and technologies that have already been trialled in mainstream gaming with varying levels of success. The new phone brings with it a state-of-the-art HDR OLED display and features augmented reality gaming capabilities, but the real star of the show is its front-mounted Face ID camera assembly. Yes, remarkably, Kinect technology is back - miniaturised and repurposed, but based on the same principles.

Digital FoundryHalo Wars 2: how Xbox One X compares to base hardware and PC

Digital Foundry's first look at X scalability on a Play Anywhere title.

If there's one aspect of Xbox One X coverage we've yet to explore in depth so far, it's how enhanced first-party titles compare with existing PC and Xbox One versions of the same game. For example, all marketing of the beautiful Forza Motorsport 7 has been on X hardware, while other titles such as Sea of Thieves have only been demoed thus far running on the Xbox One S. The good news is that at Gamescom, we were given access to an early build of Halo Wars 2 running on Xbox One X, and armed with 4K direct feed capture, we're able to offer an early look at scalability on an established Xbox Play Anywhere title.

Digital FoundryWhat does it take to run Destiny 2 at 1080p60?

Digital Foundry on how budget PC hardware can deliver a superb experience.

The Destiny 2 beta finally arrived on PC this week, delivering a vast upgrade in terms of customisation over the console builds. Adjustable quality settings, unlocked frame-rate and field of view along with HDR support take pride of place in a package that seemingly does everything it can to capture the heart of the PC gaming enthusiast. It also gives us some idea of just how optimal the core code is, how well it scales across different hardware - and perhaps provides some insight into whether the upclocked CPUs in PS4 Pro and Xbox One X might be able to handle 60fps gameplay.

Digital FoundryHow Rise of the Tomb Raider on Xbox One X improves over PS4 Pro

UPDATE: Screenshot and video comparison assets added to the analysis.

UPDATE 30/8/17 10:10am: We've updated one of the comparison images below with fresh PS4 Pro and PC shots that replicate an additional texture layer found in Square-Enix's Xbox One X press shot, representing an injured Lara. We couldn't replicate this look within the cutscene, but thankfully Digital Foundry readers came forward to help get better matching shots. The key takeaway remains the same though - Xbox One X is clearly running with higher quality art than PS4 Pro, but there are some curious differences with the maxed-out PC version.

Digital FoundryHands-on with 10 Xbox One X games that show us what it's really capable of

Digital Foundry takes on Quantum Break, Titanfall 2, Gears of War 4, F1 2017, Shadow of War - and more.

There are two sides to the Xbox One X showing at Gamescom 2017. Initially, Microsoft's colossal acreage only seems to play host to a small range of familiar-looking wares. Forza Motorsport 7, Assassin's Creed Origins and Super Lucky's Tale - games we saw at E3 - are joined by an impressive native 4K version of Shadow of War. Aside from the Warner Bros title, there's very little new here to report on. Forza Motorsport 7 still looks beautiful (as does its companion PC build, also present at the booth) while the other titles look very similar to the builds we've already seen.