Picture of Alex Wiltshire

Alex Wiltshire

Contributor

Alex writes about video games for various publications and previously edited Edge. He can't quite decide whether Advance Wars or UFO: Enemy Unknown is the best game ever. Follow him on Twitter @rotational.

Featured articles

FeatureThe many faces of DOOM's afterlife

How an ardent modding community kept bringing id Software's classic back from the dead.

The measure of any piece of hardware is whether it can run Doom. And it turns out that pretty much any modern computer can, whether it's a MacBook Pro's Touch Bar, the programmable display in a key on the Optimus Maximum keyboard or a Vtech InnoTab.

FeatureThe archaeologists of Skyrim

Meet the players trying to bring Tamriel's lost history to life.

In the dank underbelly of Riften, through the sewers that service the town and into the dripping cistern that the Thieves Guild calls home, is a man called Rune. He rises at 8am, stands about for most of the day until 10pm, and then goes to practise with his dagger on a dummy for a few hours until bedtime.

FeatureWhy I love video game credits

Another list feature?

In a wood in the south of The Witcher 3's Toussaint lies a cemetery called Mere-Lachaiselongue. Perhaps you've been there, and perhaps you took the time to read the the inscriptions on its tumbling gravestones. If you did, they might have given you pause. They don't really fit in Toussaint, or, indeed, in White Orchard or anywhere else.

Featureid takes back control of Doom's broken multiplayer on PC

Missing features, rampant cheating and more - what id's doing in response to Doom's troubled MP.

Doom's campaign was a wonderful surprise, and a progressive and worthy follow-up to a true classic. The multiplayer? Not so much. Sure, it's fun enough, and as Jon Denton said the other day, it features some smart design. But few would argue that Doom's multiplayer holds a candle to its campaign, despite it being a major focus in promotion on the run-up to release.

Sokobond review

Breaking bond.

To me, the best puzzle games feel like they've been discovered, not designed. Like they've always been there, waiting for someone to come along and uncover them. In the world of puzzle games, developers like Drop7 co-creator Frank Lantz are scientists or explorers, unearthing perfect gems which shine with a complexity that unfurls from a set of simple rules which, once you've grasped them, feel like natural laws. Sokobond is one of these puzzle games - and fittingly, when you start playing it, it feels like a game you've discovered, too.