Hideo Kojima has said that Metal Gear Solid: Rising is still at an "experimental level", and the team is aiming to go "the next step beyond" with every aspect of the game.

"And how we go up a step is really a big job, actually," Kojima told GamePro. "What we're doing right now is making totally new - not just overhauled - engines and AI and things like that. Even the management and team formations at Kojima Productions we are changing around."

And so the multiplatform project dominates the developer's resources which, he said, hasn't gone down terribly well with the MGS Peace Walker PSP team.

"The reason why I say they are not good friends is because the PSP [team] is working day and night to make [Peace Walker] even better than MGS4, but of course they can't do it because of a lot of restrictions," explained Kojima.

"On the other hand, the Rising team is using loads of money and loads of capacity and hardware specs. If you can, imagine the PSP team looking at the Rising team saying, 'They have all the money and specs!' That's the one reason why they are not good friends.

"It's interesting for me to see the team members act in this way," he added. "This was never [the case] before because it was always just one small team. Now we are much bigger."

While MGS Rising may be the focus, Kojima assured us the Peace Walker team is not made up of "s****y staff". In fact, Kojima is leading the project himself, after opting for an overseer position on MGS Rising.

Head over to our Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker and Metal Gear Solid: Rising gamepages to find out more.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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