Lars Von Trier's controversial Antichrist movie will be turned into an equally disturbing videogame that contains "dead kids, nudity and graphical violence".

"[The movie] goes against all the conventions of how you make games and what you can do in games. Dead kids, nudity, graphic violence. It will be a very controversial game, and itíll be a game that doesnít really compare with anything else," game director Morten Iversen told MTV Multiplayer.

The film Antichrist, a two-hander starring Willem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsbourg, was screened at Cannes last month. Despite consternation, the BBFC has passed the film for UK release as an 18-rated picture. Antichrist is expected to arrive later this year.

The story follows a couple who traipse into the woods to pursue some kind of psychiatric course of therapy. It doesn't go well, as the movie trailer shows.

Zentropa, Von Trier's production company, will develop the game, which is dubbed Eden - the same name as the forest cabin the couple stay at.

"I admire Lars von Trierís work immensely, and look forward to developing this game based on his work and hopefully with his creative input. Heís an extremely creative, condescending, misogynist genius with a shipload of phobias rattling him every day, so weíre like kindred spirits," added Iversen, a former member of the IO Interactive Hitman team.

Eden's release is penned for next year. Platforms aren't mentioned, and Iversen's not sure Microsoft's keen on Eden for Project Natal.

"Of course if Microsoft is interested, they could bring us an offer. Chopping of axes and stuff like that, Iím not sure Microsoft would be extremely happy to have a nihilist game with their technology," he said.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

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Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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