A Definitive Edition of Divinity: Original Sin 2 is coming to PS4 and Xbox One in August - a three-hour demo is actually available now on Xbox One, for free, via Game Preview - and to PC as a free upgrade (although it will be considered a separate game). It's a similar deal to the Enhanced Edition for Divinity: Original Sin 1. We knew that; what we didn't know was how DOS2 will be enhanced, but now we know more.

Apparently there are 45 pages of changes documented internally, developer Larian told USgamer at a preview event this week. Some of the more significant changes include reworking the weaker Act 3 section of the game - rewriting it, re-voicing it and re-scripting it.

The game's Journal is being redone, there's going to be a new tutorial, and there will be a Story Mode difficulty for people who want to breeze through without the combat challenge.

Larian has also made a new feedback system, personified as Feedback Billy, for the game.

There will be a party inventory system to alleviate sifting through everyone's bags, PCGamer added, plus some quirky-sounding DLC about a squirrel strugling with an existential crisis - in DOS you can talk to pets, remember.

Console versions of Divinity: Original Sin 2 will have radial menus to handle items and abilities, and there's the neat touch of being able to hold down the A face-button on Xbox, and presumably X on PS4, to see all interactable objects in the local area.

A detailed list of changes is coming soon, apparently.

Divinity: Original Sin 2, released last autumn on PC, was one of the finest role-playing games in years. Rick Lane even went so far as to call it "Larian's masterpiece" in Eurogamer's Divinity: Original Sin 2 review.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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