Ninja Theory's critically acclaimed action game and study of psychosis, Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, is heading to Xbox. It had only previously been available on PC and PS4. And there isn't long to wait: Hellblade will be released on Xbox 11th April.

Hellblade will also be enhanced for Xbox One X, and offer three performance modes. Enhanced Visuals will add unspecified extra effects and visual quality; High Framerate will run the game at 60 frames per second; and High Resolution will aim for 4K resolution with dynamic scaling.

HDR is supported as standard on both Xbox One and X, apparently.

Hellblade will cost Ł25/€30/$30 on Xbox, and there's a slight 10 per cent discount if you pre-order this coming week.

Hellblade was released in August last year. It was Ninja Theory's brave attempt at being its own boss and self-publishing, which allowed the team to go all-in on the unique subject matter of a lead character suffering from psychosis. It worked wonderfully. Johnny Chiodini called Hellblade "a game of astounding boldness" when including it in Eurogamer's top 10 games of 2017, and declared Hellblade 'Essential' in his review.

Hellblade went on to sell half-a-million copies in three months, making it a commercial success as well, and it now leads the 2018 BAFTA game award nominations with nine nods including Best Game.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

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Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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