Microsoft will continue to invest in Xbox games from independent studios, Xbox boss Phil Spencer has said, despite being the cancellation of Scalebound having "hurt" both him and fans.

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One thing which may change, however, is how early we hear about these games.

Microsoft confirmed Scalebound's cancellation on Monday, shortly after Eurogamer broke word that the platform holder had parted ways with developer Platinum Games and work on the project had ceased.

Writing on Twitter last night, Spencer addressed Scalebound's cancellation in a number of responses to fans.

"It hurt me as well and to the community I apologise," he began. "I want everything we start to turn out great, to take risks, create diversity.

"Starting new [projects] is critical," he continued. "I will think more about when we show new stuff, that's good learning for me.

Scalebound was first shown publicly at E3 2014. The announcement of its cancellation this week comes after years of trailers, presentations and hands-on events.

"I won't abandon signing independent studio projects but I agree first party internal studios are critical," Spencer wrote to another fan, and added: "I know we have to take risks, I realise right now [that] probably sounds hollow but I agree."

Spencer's messages last night follow an initial comment earlier this week where he stated that Scalebound's cancellation was "better for Xbox gamers" - a remark which raised eyebrows among fans.

As it currently stands, Microsoft's 2017 line-up for Xbox comprises Crackdown 3, Sea of Thieves, Halo Wars 2 and State of Decay 2.

Yesterday, Scalebound director Hideki Kamiya also apologised for the game's cancellation, which had "let fans down".

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Tom Phillips

Tom Phillips

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