It feels strange to say it so soon after launch, but I think I'm about done with No Man's Sky. On paper it's very much my kind of game - I'm a big Elite: Dangerous fan and very much enjoy bimbling around in open world games - but there's simply something about the experience of playing No Man's Sky that rings hollow.

I've been doing a fair bit of thinking about this and I'm convinced the reason for the flat gameplay experience lies somewhere between procedural generation and emergent gameplay - specifically that No Man's Sky has shedloads of the former and almost none of the latter.

The video above explains what I mean in greater detail, with reference to other games that use procedural generation to far greater effect. Sad as I am to say it, I feel like I've less reached a journey milestone in No Man's Sky and more reached journey's end.

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Johnny Chiodini

Johnny Chiodini

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Johnny is one quarter of the Eurogamer video team - specifically the part that looks like it comes from East London. He loves pen and paper role playing games, his dog Watson, and pretty much any video game with a bit of grimdark to it. You are almost certainly pronouncing his surname incorrectly.

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